Title

The Effect Of Bisphenol-A Concentrations On The Heart Rate Of Daphnia Magna /

Author(s)

Matthew Payne

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Written Paper Award

1st Place

Abstract

For the past 15 years, the presence of Bisphenol-A in plastics has been a concern for many Americans. It is proven to be an endocrine disruptor and is credited with problems in the reproductive system. Recent studies have linked it to the development of cardiovascular disease. Daphnia magna were exposed to BPA to see if there was a link to symptoms of cardiovascular disease, especially fluctuating heart rate and mortality. This would open doors to more cardiovascular awareness. It was hypothesized that the treated Daphnia magna would return heart rates that would be significantly different than the mean. BPA was placed in water with concentrations 0.28ng/ml, 1.385ng/ml, and 2.49ng/ml. The water was placed in containers and applied to the groups containing 10 organisms. After 30 minutes, then after 1 hour, the heart rate was counted for 10 seconds and multiplied by 6 to get the beats per minute and averaged for all 10 Daphnia magna in the group. This study found that there were significant differences (F (9,85) = 3.23, p=.002) in the means between treatment groups containing 0.28ng/ml of BPA and 1.385ng/ml. It was concluded that the BPA altered the heart rates of the Daphnia magna and the same results could potentially be seen in humans. /

Location

Kinard 119

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:00 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:00 AM

The Effect Of Bisphenol-A Concentrations On The Heart Rate Of Daphnia Magna /

Kinard 119

For the past 15 years, the presence of Bisphenol-A in plastics has been a concern for many Americans. It is proven to be an endocrine disruptor and is credited with problems in the reproductive system. Recent studies have linked it to the development of cardiovascular disease. Daphnia magna were exposed to BPA to see if there was a link to symptoms of cardiovascular disease, especially fluctuating heart rate and mortality. This would open doors to more cardiovascular awareness. It was hypothesized that the treated Daphnia magna would return heart rates that would be significantly different than the mean. BPA was placed in water with concentrations 0.28ng/ml, 1.385ng/ml, and 2.49ng/ml. The water was placed in containers and applied to the groups containing 10 organisms. After 30 minutes, then after 1 hour, the heart rate was counted for 10 seconds and multiplied by 6 to get the beats per minute and averaged for all 10 Daphnia magna in the group. This study found that there were significant differences (F (9,85) = 3.23, p=.002) in the means between treatment groups containing 0.28ng/ml of BPA and 1.385ng/ml. It was concluded that the BPA altered the heart rates of the Daphnia magna and the same results could potentially be seen in humans. /