Title

Preparing Healthy Snacks with Third Graders to Improve Knowledge of Nutrition

Author(s)

Samantha McCall

School Name

Chapin High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

A growing problem in the United States is the disease known as obesity, which affects 18% of children in the United States. Obesity, the condition of having 20% more body fat than the ideal percentage of body fat for one’s height, begins with children and continues into adulthood. Nutrition knowledge is important to instill healthy lifestyles in young people. This project answers the question “Would four weeks of weekly preparation of healthy snacks with a small group of Chapin area third grade students improve their knowledge of nutrition?”, by collecting pre- and post-test scores on nutrition knowledge. Nine third grade students participated in the four week class as part of their afterschool program. They were able to prepare different types of snacks based around four themes of nutrition—colorful fruits and vegetables, drinks with low sugar content, healthy snacks, and whole grains. The data collected thus far shows compelling evidence that cooking with third graders does improve their knowledge of nutrition: 88% of participants improved in their knowledge of nutrition. It is predicted that through further research their knowledge of nutrition will be reflected in their choice of snacks.

Location

Written Only

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:15 AM

Preparing Healthy Snacks with Third Graders to Improve Knowledge of Nutrition

Written Only

A growing problem in the United States is the disease known as obesity, which affects 18% of children in the United States. Obesity, the condition of having 20% more body fat than the ideal percentage of body fat for one’s height, begins with children and continues into adulthood. Nutrition knowledge is important to instill healthy lifestyles in young people. This project answers the question “Would four weeks of weekly preparation of healthy snacks with a small group of Chapin area third grade students improve their knowledge of nutrition?”, by collecting pre- and post-test scores on nutrition knowledge. Nine third grade students participated in the four week class as part of their afterschool program. They were able to prepare different types of snacks based around four themes of nutrition—colorful fruits and vegetables, drinks with low sugar content, healthy snacks, and whole grains. The data collected thus far shows compelling evidence that cooking with third graders does improve their knowledge of nutrition: 88% of participants improved in their knowledge of nutrition. It is predicted that through further research their knowledge of nutrition will be reflected in their choice of snacks.