Title

Protein-Peptide Interaction Patterns Of M-10 And Inhibitory Effects On Collagen Expression By M-10 Peptide In Ssc Lung Fibroblasts

Author(s)

Austin Moore

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Bogatkevich; Department of Rheumatology and Immunology, Medical University of South Carolina

Abstract

It is known that the M-10 peptide has an antifibrotic effect on fibroblasts that have Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Lung Fibrosis. This paper focuses on how a modified M-10 peptide would interact with the fibroblasts. A caspase 3 inhibitor was added to the peptide to enable more control over the diseased cell. However, the impact of the addition of this caspase 3 inhibitor on the cell was unknown. A Western Blot was performed to test if this modified M-10 peptide would still reduce collagen levels in fibroblasts, therefore, inhibiting fibrosis. A standard staining experiment was also performed to determine if the modified M-10 peptide was able to enter the nucleus so that it could have an impact on the cell by inhibiting collagen expression. The fibroblast cells used were MRC5, A549, and N9 cells. The results from the Western Blot were successful since collagen expression was reduced in fibroblasts with the M-10 peptide and TGF-β when compared to fibroblasts with only TGF-β. The staining experiment was also successful because under a fluorescent microscope, the red-stained peptide was clearly visible throughout the cell and nucleus, therefore it would be able to interact with and impact the cell to inhibit fibrosis.

Location

Owens 201

Start Date

4-16-2016 10:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 10:45 AM

Protein-Peptide Interaction Patterns Of M-10 And Inhibitory Effects On Collagen Expression By M-10 Peptide In Ssc Lung Fibroblasts

Owens 201

It is known that the M-10 peptide has an antifibrotic effect on fibroblasts that have Systemic Sclerosis (SSc) Lung Fibrosis. This paper focuses on how a modified M-10 peptide would interact with the fibroblasts. A caspase 3 inhibitor was added to the peptide to enable more control over the diseased cell. However, the impact of the addition of this caspase 3 inhibitor on the cell was unknown. A Western Blot was performed to test if this modified M-10 peptide would still reduce collagen levels in fibroblasts, therefore, inhibiting fibrosis. A standard staining experiment was also performed to determine if the modified M-10 peptide was able to enter the nucleus so that it could have an impact on the cell by inhibiting collagen expression. The fibroblast cells used were MRC5, A549, and N9 cells. The results from the Western Blot were successful since collagen expression was reduced in fibroblasts with the M-10 peptide and TGF-β when compared to fibroblasts with only TGF-β. The staining experiment was also successful because under a fluorescent microscope, the red-stained peptide was clearly visible throughout the cell and nucleus, therefore it would be able to interact with and impact the cell to inhibit fibrosis.