Title

Transposable Elements Containing Binding Sites For Pluripotency Transcription Factors Function As Enhancers In Mouse Embryonic Stems Cells

Author(s)

Asia Paguntalan

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Wang; Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Written Paper Award

3rd Place

Abstract

Transposable elements (TEs) make up nearly half of the human genome, but until the 1950’s were considered “junk DNA.” Barbara McClintock’s seminal maize experiments established TEs as key regulatory components due to their ability to move about the genome. More recent studies demonstrate that TEs are enriched for binding sites for cell-specific transcription factors (TFs). This study examines the extent to which a TE with binding sites for multiple pluripotency TFs regulates differential gene expression in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Three potential regulatory regions consisting of a TE with multiple binding sites, a non-TE region with multiple binding sites, and a TE without binding sites were cloned from the mouse genome and inserted into luciferase reporter vectors. These vectors were transfected into cells and luciferase assays were conducted to measure the regulatory potential of these three regions, along with positive and negative controls. The results of these assays indicate that a TE bound with multiple TFs enhances cell-specific expression of a nearby gene to a greater extent than a TE without TF binding sites or a non-TE region bound with multiple TFs. In conclusion, these findings highlight the role of TEs in enhancing differential gene expression in conjunction with cell-specific TFs. However, further research is needed to investigate role of TEs bound by cell-specific TFs in gene regulatory networks.

Location

Owens 201

Start Date

4-16-2016 11:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 11:15 AM

Transposable Elements Containing Binding Sites For Pluripotency Transcription Factors Function As Enhancers In Mouse Embryonic Stems Cells

Owens 201

Transposable elements (TEs) make up nearly half of the human genome, but until the 1950’s were considered “junk DNA.” Barbara McClintock’s seminal maize experiments established TEs as key regulatory components due to their ability to move about the genome. More recent studies demonstrate that TEs are enriched for binding sites for cell-specific transcription factors (TFs). This study examines the extent to which a TE with binding sites for multiple pluripotency TFs regulates differential gene expression in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Three potential regulatory regions consisting of a TE with multiple binding sites, a non-TE region with multiple binding sites, and a TE without binding sites were cloned from the mouse genome and inserted into luciferase reporter vectors. These vectors were transfected into cells and luciferase assays were conducted to measure the regulatory potential of these three regions, along with positive and negative controls. The results of these assays indicate that a TE bound with multiple TFs enhances cell-specific expression of a nearby gene to a greater extent than a TE without TF binding sites or a non-TE region bound with multiple TFs. In conclusion, these findings highlight the role of TEs in enhancing differential gene expression in conjunction with cell-specific TFs. However, further research is needed to investigate role of TEs bound by cell-specific TFs in gene regulatory networks.