Title

The Effect Of Signaling Factors On The Differentiation Of Progenitor Cells

Author(s)

Amanda Steel

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Cell and Molecular Biology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Jabbari; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina

Abstract

Tissue Engineering is an interdisciplinary field that applies engineering and life sciences to the development of biological substitutes that restore biological tissue function. The three main aspects are cells, scaffolds and growth signals. This experiment dealt with the cell aspect. Progenitor cells have the ability to differentiate into many different cells. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have the potency to differentiate to bone, cartilage, muscle, and fat. Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) have the potency to differentiate to endothelial cells. While scaffolds help cells differentiate, there are also biological signals which accelerate differentiation. Growth factors are what initiate this signaling and designate the lineage. In our experiment, hMSCs and ECFCs were cultured at the bottom of well plates in 2D environments and encapsulated inside hydrogels for 3D culture. Hydrogels are cross-linked polymeric structures, which mimic the extra cellular matrix of cells. Basic and differentiation media was added to both cell types. The growth and differentiation of the cells were observed at different time points. For results, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression and calcium content of the hMSC were measured as markers of osteogenic differentiation. After fourteen days, there was a significantly higher expression of ALP in hMSCs in osteogenic media. For 3D samples, using PCR, the upregulation of expression of the genes were measured by markers ALP and PECAM-1. Further research will apply these results to making scaffolds to use in bone repair.

Location

Owens 202

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:15 AM

The Effect Of Signaling Factors On The Differentiation Of Progenitor Cells

Owens 202

Tissue Engineering is an interdisciplinary field that applies engineering and life sciences to the development of biological substitutes that restore biological tissue function. The three main aspects are cells, scaffolds and growth signals. This experiment dealt with the cell aspect. Progenitor cells have the ability to differentiate into many different cells. Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) have the potency to differentiate to bone, cartilage, muscle, and fat. Endothelial Colony Forming Cells (ECFCs) have the potency to differentiate to endothelial cells. While scaffolds help cells differentiate, there are also biological signals which accelerate differentiation. Growth factors are what initiate this signaling and designate the lineage. In our experiment, hMSCs and ECFCs were cultured at the bottom of well plates in 2D environments and encapsulated inside hydrogels for 3D culture. Hydrogels are cross-linked polymeric structures, which mimic the extra cellular matrix of cells. Basic and differentiation media was added to both cell types. The growth and differentiation of the cells were observed at different time points. For results, Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) expression and calcium content of the hMSC were measured as markers of osteogenic differentiation. After fourteen days, there was a significantly higher expression of ALP in hMSCs in osteogenic media. For 3D samples, using PCR, the upregulation of expression of the genes were measured by markers ALP and PECAM-1. Further research will apply these results to making scaffolds to use in bone repair.