Title

Light Harvesting And Energy Transfer In Metal-Organic Frameworks

Author(s)

Hailey Areheart

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Chemistry

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Shustova; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina

Abstract

The purpose of this investigation is to find a solution to society’s dependency on fossil fuels since they aren’t renewable and are harmful to our environment. The collective arrangement around a reaction center and ensemble chromophore behavior is precisely depended on the light-harvesting efficiency of the natural photosystem. Chromophore behavior, which is observed in the natural photosystem, has the possibility of being replicated by metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs are remarkably organized, crystalline, self-assembled materials which can be used as a platform to study light harvesting and energy transfer systems. Energy transfer and light harvesting capabilities can also be controlled using external stimuli. Using MOFs as a platform, we were be able to use a photoswitch to control light harvesting and energy transfer via irradiation of different types of light. To synthesize the MOF, bis(5-pyridyl-2-methyl-3-thienyl)-cyclopentene (BPMTC) was immobilized inside the MOF. To confirm that the MOF was synthesized, 1H NMR, Powder X-ray Diffraction, Mass-Spectrometry, Diffuse Reflectance Spectra, and Emission Intensity was utilized, and indicated that the MOF did harvest light and transfer energy while possessing the ability to turn “on” and “off”. The results of this project can lead researchers in many directions, for example investigating a less costly and more effective photoswitch. This project was successful in creating a MOF and is the first step in finding an easier and more effective way to power our society.

Location

Owens 101

Start Date

4-16-2016 8:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 8:45 AM

Light Harvesting And Energy Transfer In Metal-Organic Frameworks

Owens 101

The purpose of this investigation is to find a solution to society’s dependency on fossil fuels since they aren’t renewable and are harmful to our environment. The collective arrangement around a reaction center and ensemble chromophore behavior is precisely depended on the light-harvesting efficiency of the natural photosystem. Chromophore behavior, which is observed in the natural photosystem, has the possibility of being replicated by metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). MOFs are remarkably organized, crystalline, self-assembled materials which can be used as a platform to study light harvesting and energy transfer systems. Energy transfer and light harvesting capabilities can also be controlled using external stimuli. Using MOFs as a platform, we were be able to use a photoswitch to control light harvesting and energy transfer via irradiation of different types of light. To synthesize the MOF, bis(5-pyridyl-2-methyl-3-thienyl)-cyclopentene (BPMTC) was immobilized inside the MOF. To confirm that the MOF was synthesized, 1H NMR, Powder X-ray Diffraction, Mass-Spectrometry, Diffuse Reflectance Spectra, and Emission Intensity was utilized, and indicated that the MOF did harvest light and transfer energy while possessing the ability to turn “on” and “off”. The results of this project can lead researchers in many directions, for example investigating a less costly and more effective photoswitch. This project was successful in creating a MOF and is the first step in finding an easier and more effective way to power our society.