Title

The Transformation And Modification Of Inkjet Printers Into Low-Cost Bioprinters For The Characterization Of Precise Cell Patterning

Author(s)

Ali Maclay

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Rodriguez-Devora; Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University

Abstract

Bioprinting is a relatively new technological advancement. Recently, high throughput bioscreening has allowed for a quick screening of the biological or biochemical activity of a large number of compounds against biological targets. Transforming regular inkjet printers into bioprinters allows for a faster and cheaper way to screen the biological effects of various compounds. Therefore, it is important that inkjet bioprinters are characterized in order to further research in areas such as cell-based diagnostics, drug allocating, and tissue engineering. For this research, a HP Deskjet 600 printer was converted into a bioprinter. The fluid printing capabilities were calibrated for different printed shapes, fluid viscosities, and shades of black/gray printed. The performance of the printer in cell printing applications was assessed for MCF-7 and 3T3 cells using a live/dead cell assay, a cell-volume calibration, a cell proliferation assay, and by printing precise patterns. The results of these various tests determine that modified inkjet printing is a viable technique for bioprinting, including cell patterning. This study also identifies future avenues for research, such as tissue engineering or personalized cell-based diagnostics.

Location

Owens G07

Start Date

4-16-2016 11:45 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 11:45 AM

The Transformation And Modification Of Inkjet Printers Into Low-Cost Bioprinters For The Characterization Of Precise Cell Patterning

Owens G07

Bioprinting is a relatively new technological advancement. Recently, high throughput bioscreening has allowed for a quick screening of the biological or biochemical activity of a large number of compounds against biological targets. Transforming regular inkjet printers into bioprinters allows for a faster and cheaper way to screen the biological effects of various compounds. Therefore, it is important that inkjet bioprinters are characterized in order to further research in areas such as cell-based diagnostics, drug allocating, and tissue engineering. For this research, a HP Deskjet 600 printer was converted into a bioprinter. The fluid printing capabilities were calibrated for different printed shapes, fluid viscosities, and shades of black/gray printed. The performance of the printer in cell printing applications was assessed for MCF-7 and 3T3 cells using a live/dead cell assay, a cell-volume calibration, a cell proliferation assay, and by printing precise patterns. The results of these various tests determine that modified inkjet printing is a viable technique for bioprinting, including cell patterning. This study also identifies future avenues for research, such as tissue engineering or personalized cell-based diagnostics.