Title

Transformation And Characterization Of Deskjet Printers Into Low-Cost Bioprinters For Drug Screening And Cell Printing

Author(s)

Ariel Moore

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Rodriguez-Devora; Department of Bioengineering, Clemson University

Abstract

Drug development is a timely and risky industry. High throughput drug-screening using inkjet printing technology could be the solution to the problems that arise during drug trials. This work shows the modifications made to an inkjet printer in order to make it fit to be used to print anti-cancer drugs. An HP Deskjet 600 printer was characterized in order to establish what volume of a liquid could be printed for different pixel sizes, liquid viscosities and colors. MCF-7 cells and 3T3 cells and an anti-cancer drug were pipetted into one cell plate while cells were pipetted but the anti-cancer drug was printed into another cell plate. The cells in both cell plates were counted using CellTiter 96® AQueous One Solution Assay each day from day 0 – day 4. Then the effect of the pipetted anti-cancer drug was compared to the effect of the printed anti-cancer drug on the cells. This work has the potential to lead to further development in high throughput bioprinting technology.

Location

Owens G07

Start Date

4-16-2016 2:45 PM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 2:45 PM

Transformation And Characterization Of Deskjet Printers Into Low-Cost Bioprinters For Drug Screening And Cell Printing

Owens G07

Drug development is a timely and risky industry. High throughput drug-screening using inkjet printing technology could be the solution to the problems that arise during drug trials. This work shows the modifications made to an inkjet printer in order to make it fit to be used to print anti-cancer drugs. An HP Deskjet 600 printer was characterized in order to establish what volume of a liquid could be printed for different pixel sizes, liquid viscosities and colors. MCF-7 cells and 3T3 cells and an anti-cancer drug were pipetted into one cell plate while cells were pipetted but the anti-cancer drug was printed into another cell plate. The cells in both cell plates were counted using CellTiter 96® AQueous One Solution Assay each day from day 0 – day 4. Then the effect of the pipetted anti-cancer drug was compared to the effect of the printed anti-cancer drug on the cells. This work has the potential to lead to further development in high throughput bioprinting technology.