Title

Atomic Force Microscopy Study Of 4-Hexangonal Silicon Carbide

Author(s)

Karan Sah

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Chandrashekhar; Department of Electrical Engineering, University of South Carolina

Abstract

The energy industry is expanding at a rapid pace. However semiconductors able to use power efficiently are lacking. Silicon Carbide (SiC) has the potential of overtaking Silicon (Si) and Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) as a primary semiconductor in devices for high-power, high-frequency, high-temperature applications. Furthermore, SC is radiation resistant. Despite its high amount of device applications, SiC has a high number of defects in the bulk growth of the crystal. Current methods of growing SiC crystals are producing many defects, making it unreliable for industrial use. Understanding the defects made in the bulk/epitaxy growth of the crystal is necessary to make it more useful. A solution to make SiC industry-ready is cutting the wafers of the crystals at an angle before growth to produce different growth types. Observations of the different off-cut samples where made with the use of an Atomic Force Microscopy Machine (AFM) and optical microscope. Higher angled cuts produced samples with less defects and more efficient epilayers. Where there is a growing industry of high power and more efficient device applications, SiC may enable the industry to grow by providing a more efficient semiconductor for many applications.

Location

Owens G07

Start Date

4-16-2016 2:00 PM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 2:00 PM

Atomic Force Microscopy Study Of 4-Hexangonal Silicon Carbide

Owens G07

The energy industry is expanding at a rapid pace. However semiconductors able to use power efficiently are lacking. Silicon Carbide (SiC) has the potential of overtaking Silicon (Si) and Gallium Arsenide (GaAs) as a primary semiconductor in devices for high-power, high-frequency, high-temperature applications. Furthermore, SC is radiation resistant. Despite its high amount of device applications, SiC has a high number of defects in the bulk growth of the crystal. Current methods of growing SiC crystals are producing many defects, making it unreliable for industrial use. Understanding the defects made in the bulk/epitaxy growth of the crystal is necessary to make it more useful. A solution to make SiC industry-ready is cutting the wafers of the crystals at an angle before growth to produce different growth types. Observations of the different off-cut samples where made with the use of an Atomic Force Microscopy Machine (AFM) and optical microscope. Higher angled cuts produced samples with less defects and more efficient epilayers. Where there is a growing industry of high power and more efficient device applications, SiC may enable the industry to grow by providing a more efficient semiconductor for many applications.