Title

The Devolopment And Analysis Of Core-Shell Bio-Nanoparticles Using P4V4 And Transferrin For Drug Delivery

Author(s)

Matthew Berry

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Math

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Biochemistry

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Dr. Wang; Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of South Carolina

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

It is observed that cancer killing drugs have no mechanism for reaching a tumor itself. This project utilized the binding of proteins to polymers to create core-shell bio-nanoparticles in order to conceal the cancer drug. With the protein as the shell, the protein would be able to recognize and bind to the walls of the specified cancer tumors and disperse the concealed drug from the polymer. A total of three polymers were tested for the binding of transferrin as well as the effects on the secondary folding structure of the protein. By testing transferrin with P4VP and PCL-py, the binding of proteins to hydrophobic as well as hydrophilic polymers could be studied in order to understand how they would adsorb to each other. PCL-(PCL-Py), was bound to doxorubicin and then adsorbed to the protein. Through dynamic light scattering, size shifts in the nanoparticles were found to be based on the amount of protein added compared to polymer. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy, it was found that the secondary folding structure was relatively unaffected by the binding of the protein to the polymer. With the ability to manipulate the size of nanoparticles while keeping them stable, smaller tumors can be found.

Location

Owens 203

Start Date

4-16-2016 9:15 AM

COinS
 
Apr 16th, 9:15 AM

The Devolopment And Analysis Of Core-Shell Bio-Nanoparticles Using P4V4 And Transferrin For Drug Delivery

Owens 203

It is observed that cancer killing drugs have no mechanism for reaching a tumor itself. This project utilized the binding of proteins to polymers to create core-shell bio-nanoparticles in order to conceal the cancer drug. With the protein as the shell, the protein would be able to recognize and bind to the walls of the specified cancer tumors and disperse the concealed drug from the polymer. A total of three polymers were tested for the binding of transferrin as well as the effects on the secondary folding structure of the protein. By testing transferrin with P4VP and PCL-py, the binding of proteins to hydrophobic as well as hydrophilic polymers could be studied in order to understand how they would adsorb to each other. PCL-(PCL-Py), was bound to doxorubicin and then adsorbed to the protein. Through dynamic light scattering, size shifts in the nanoparticles were found to be based on the amount of protein added compared to polymer. Using circular dichroism spectroscopy, it was found that the secondary folding structure was relatively unaffected by the binding of the protein to the polymer. With the ability to manipulate the size of nanoparticles while keeping them stable, smaller tumors can be found.