Title

Characterizing The Mechanical Properties of JSC Mars-1A Martian Soil Simulants

School Name

Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Qiushi Chen, Clemson University

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Abstract

The lunar landing was an enormous step in humanity’s exploration of space. At last we’re nearly ready to take the next step—a human landing on a nearby planet. Scientists at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) predict that sometime in the 2030’s, humans will land on Mars. In order to reach this goal NASA has created a road map of technological goals that must be accomplished prior to launch. This research project complements a recent SC NASA Space Consortium funded project to study the feasibility of using simulated in-situ Martian soils to create functional building blocks. The objectives of this project are to characterize the mechanical properties of JSC-1A Martian soil simulant, in particular, the grain size distribution and shear strength of the simulant, through a series of soil mechanics experiments. Secondly, to compile, analyze and prepare experimental data for calibrating numerical models. In order to observe the grain size distribution, sieve analyses and hydrometer analyses were performed on the Martian simulant. To test the shear strength and calculate the friction angle of the simulant, shear tests were run. The results from these tests can be used to help determine whether the Martian regolith can be used to construct building blocks on Mars.

Location

Wall 223

Start Date

3-25-2017 2:15 PM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

Yes

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 2:15 PM

Characterizing The Mechanical Properties of JSC Mars-1A Martian Soil Simulants

Wall 223

The lunar landing was an enormous step in humanity’s exploration of space. At last we’re nearly ready to take the next step—a human landing on a nearby planet. Scientists at NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) predict that sometime in the 2030’s, humans will land on Mars. In order to reach this goal NASA has created a road map of technological goals that must be accomplished prior to launch. This research project complements a recent SC NASA Space Consortium funded project to study the feasibility of using simulated in-situ Martian soils to create functional building blocks. The objectives of this project are to characterize the mechanical properties of JSC-1A Martian soil simulant, in particular, the grain size distribution and shear strength of the simulant, through a series of soil mechanics experiments. Secondly, to compile, analyze and prepare experimental data for calibrating numerical models. In order to observe the grain size distribution, sieve analyses and hydrometer analyses were performed on the Martian simulant. To test the shear strength and calculate the friction angle of the simulant, shear tests were run. The results from these tests can be used to help determine whether the Martian regolith can be used to construct building blocks on Mars.