Title

Effects of Cysteine on the Aggregation and Dissolution of Silver Nanoparticles

School Name

Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Mentored

Mentor

Mentor: Mohammed Baalousha, University of South Carolina

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

This research investigated the aggregation rates of Silver Nanoparticles and how various levels of L-Cysteine and N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine could affect those rates. Silver Nanoparticles are industrially-made particles, used for their antimicrobial properties. When they make their way into the aquatic environment, they can have toxic effects on sea life, both large and small. We investigated the interactions between the Silver Nanoparticles and two different types of Cysteine, which is a naturally occurring biomolecule. We looked at what wavelength of light the Silver Nanoparticles were absorbing both before and after the interaction with the Cysteines as well as how much of that wavelength they were absorbing using the UV-Visual Spectrometer. We found that the Silver Nanoparticles alone absorbed light the most at 394 nm. When we observed the absorbance throughout the interaction, we found a quick drop in absorbance during the first ten second and then a slow decrease throughout the rest of the ten minutes we had the solution in the machine. We also measured the dissolution rates of the Silver Nanoparticles to see whether they would dissolve back into ions after they have already formed aggregates. Once the Silver Nanoparticles formed aggregates they were not as likely to dissolve as they were on their own. In the future it would be interesting to observe Silver Nanoparticle in the presence of biomolecules other than Cysteine.

Location

Wall 205

Start Date

3-25-2017 10:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 10:00 AM

Effects of Cysteine on the Aggregation and Dissolution of Silver Nanoparticles

Wall 205

This research investigated the aggregation rates of Silver Nanoparticles and how various levels of L-Cysteine and N-Acetyl-L-Cysteine could affect those rates. Silver Nanoparticles are industrially-made particles, used for their antimicrobial properties. When they make their way into the aquatic environment, they can have toxic effects on sea life, both large and small. We investigated the interactions between the Silver Nanoparticles and two different types of Cysteine, which is a naturally occurring biomolecule. We looked at what wavelength of light the Silver Nanoparticles were absorbing both before and after the interaction with the Cysteines as well as how much of that wavelength they were absorbing using the UV-Visual Spectrometer. We found that the Silver Nanoparticles alone absorbed light the most at 394 nm. When we observed the absorbance throughout the interaction, we found a quick drop in absorbance during the first ten second and then a slow decrease throughout the rest of the ten minutes we had the solution in the machine. We also measured the dissolution rates of the Silver Nanoparticles to see whether they would dissolve back into ions after they have already formed aggregates. Once the Silver Nanoparticles formed aggregates they were not as likely to dissolve as they were on their own. In the future it would be interesting to observe Silver Nanoparticle in the presence of biomolecules other than Cysteine.