Title

An acute toxicity test on the effect of varying concentrations of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Daphnia magna and Artemia salina

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Written Paper Award

2nd Place

Abstract

Due to tremendous advancements in the field of industrial and consumer products, nanomaterials are being increasingly produced all over the world today. This future multi-trillion dollar business has made some concerned about nanoparticles polluting freshwater and marine regions specifically. A new research field called “aquatic nanotoxicology” explores the impacts of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms and their ecosystems. This field has become more widely studied due to the fact that 0.4-7% of all engineered nanoparticles reach a water body. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the effects of of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on Daphnia magna, a freshwater organism, and Artemia salina, a marine organism. It was hypothesized that if different concentrations of TiO2 nanoparticles are exposed to Daphnia magna and Artemia salina, then higher concentrations will cause more toxic effects to the organisms because some nanomaterials have been proven to be toxic to aquatic life. Aqueous concentrations of 1, 10, and 50 mg/L of TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared and exposed to ten organisms of Daphnia magna and Artemia salina for 96 hours. The mortality rate was checked daily. A linear regression test of R2 = 0.278, p = 0.4726 for the mortality rate of Daphnia magna showed that increased concentrations of TiO2 nanoparticles did not have an increased impact on the freshwater organisms. Similarly, a linear regression test (R2 = 0.489, p = 0.3008) was run for Artemia salina, and it indicated that increased TiO2 nanoparticle concentrations did not have an impact on the marine organisms either. In conclusion, the increased concentrations of TiO2 nanoparticles had no increased impact on either organism.

Location

Wall 206

Start Date

3-25-2017 1:45 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 25th, 1:45 PM

An acute toxicity test on the effect of varying concentrations of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on Daphnia magna and Artemia salina

Wall 206

Due to tremendous advancements in the field of industrial and consumer products, nanomaterials are being increasingly produced all over the world today. This future multi-trillion dollar business has made some concerned about nanoparticles polluting freshwater and marine regions specifically. A new research field called “aquatic nanotoxicology” explores the impacts of nanoparticles on aquatic organisms and their ecosystems. This field has become more widely studied due to the fact that 0.4-7% of all engineered nanoparticles reach a water body. The purpose of this experiment is to evaluate the effects of of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles on Daphnia magna, a freshwater organism, and Artemia salina, a marine organism. It was hypothesized that if different concentrations of TiO2 nanoparticles are exposed to Daphnia magna and Artemia salina, then higher concentrations will cause more toxic effects to the organisms because some nanomaterials have been proven to be toxic to aquatic life. Aqueous concentrations of 1, 10, and 50 mg/L of TiO2 nanoparticles were prepared and exposed to ten organisms of Daphnia magna and Artemia salina for 96 hours. The mortality rate was checked daily. A linear regression test of R2 = 0.278, p = 0.4726 for the mortality rate of Daphnia magna showed that increased concentrations of TiO2 nanoparticles did not have an increased impact on the freshwater organisms. Similarly, a linear regression test (R2 = 0.489, p = 0.3008) was run for Artemia salina, and it indicated that increased TiO2 nanoparticle concentrations did not have an impact on the marine organisms either. In conclusion, the increased concentrations of TiO2 nanoparticles had no increased impact on either organism.