Title

Effects of Low Pond Stocking Density on Spotted Sea Trout in High Temperature Mariculture Ponds

Author(s)

Phoebe Capps, GSSM

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Mariculture is a specialized branch of aquaculture involving the cultivation of marine organisms. Spotted Sea Trout are a recreationally important fish in South Carolina; this research aimed to study the cultivation of this species in mariculture ponds. Larval fish produced by broodstock fish in Charleston, South Carolina were raised at a density significantly lower than usual at the Waddell Mariculture Center. In previous years, WMC stocked SST at high densities of 125,000-150,000 larvae per 0.325-hectare pond. Survival rates were typically average, however, the fish were typically thin and frail. Over the last few years, rising temperature and changing "growing seasons" has affected the survival of SST at the previously mentioned densities. This work aimed to reevaluate stocking densities by stocking 6 ponds with 50,000 larvae in a similar temperature bin (summer). Lower stocking density proved to produce healthy fish and dramatically increased survival. This study points out various other factors that contribute to the survival and condition of fish at such a temperature and the abundance of zooplankton. The results of this study will help WMC find the optimal stocking density during the summer so that they can fill the South Carolina waterways with the largest number of healthy fish.

Location

Neville 122

Start Date

4-14-2018 11:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 11:30 AM

Effects of Low Pond Stocking Density on Spotted Sea Trout in High Temperature Mariculture Ponds

Neville 122

Mariculture is a specialized branch of aquaculture involving the cultivation of marine organisms. Spotted Sea Trout are a recreationally important fish in South Carolina; this research aimed to study the cultivation of this species in mariculture ponds. Larval fish produced by broodstock fish in Charleston, South Carolina were raised at a density significantly lower than usual at the Waddell Mariculture Center. In previous years, WMC stocked SST at high densities of 125,000-150,000 larvae per 0.325-hectare pond. Survival rates were typically average, however, the fish were typically thin and frail. Over the last few years, rising temperature and changing "growing seasons" has affected the survival of SST at the previously mentioned densities. This work aimed to reevaluate stocking densities by stocking 6 ponds with 50,000 larvae in a similar temperature bin (summer). Lower stocking density proved to produce healthy fish and dramatically increased survival. This study points out various other factors that contribute to the survival and condition of fish at such a temperature and the abundance of zooplankton. The results of this study will help WMC find the optimal stocking density during the summer so that they can fill the South Carolina waterways with the largest number of healthy fish.