Title

Soil Invertebrate Diversity in Winthrop University’s Succession Plots

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

The biodiversity of soil invertebrates that dwell in the four succession plots owned by Winthrop University, located in Rock Hill, South Carolina, is discussed. Samples were extracted using Berlese funnels and identified through stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope pictures and pre-existing keys. They were also prepped for DNA analysis and sequenced, specifically the 18S ribosomal section of DNA. The most abundant species of soil invertebrates found in each plot were separated and sorted, then alpha and beta diversity tests were done to show the diversity between the plots. It was shown that the older of the plots were more diverse than the more recently established ones. The hypothesis that plots with larger year-of-establishments gaps are more diverse was also supported. Differences between not only number of unique species but also variation of families was examined. This information, along with the identification information collected, can be used to further understand soil fauna in the area, and the DNA sequencing data can be used in metabarcoding. This research was conducted at Winthrop University, funded in part by INBRE, and mentored by Dr. Julian Smith III.

Location

Neville 122

Start Date

4-14-2018 12:15 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 12:15 PM

Soil Invertebrate Diversity in Winthrop University’s Succession Plots

Neville 122

The biodiversity of soil invertebrates that dwell in the four succession plots owned by Winthrop University, located in Rock Hill, South Carolina, is discussed. Samples were extracted using Berlese funnels and identified through stereomicroscope and scanning electron microscope pictures and pre-existing keys. They were also prepped for DNA analysis and sequenced, specifically the 18S ribosomal section of DNA. The most abundant species of soil invertebrates found in each plot were separated and sorted, then alpha and beta diversity tests were done to show the diversity between the plots. It was shown that the older of the plots were more diverse than the more recently established ones. The hypothesis that plots with larger year-of-establishments gaps are more diverse was also supported. Differences between not only number of unique species but also variation of families was examined. This information, along with the identification information collected, can be used to further understand soil fauna in the area, and the DNA sequencing data can be used in metabarcoding. This research was conducted at Winthrop University, funded in part by INBRE, and mentored by Dr. Julian Smith III.