Title

Sifting Germplasm to Identify Hypoallergenic Peanut Genotypes: Gaining Ammunitions for Future Breeding

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Botany

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

A prevalent and increasing issue in the world is peanut allergies. Allergic reactions can range anywhere from minor to deadly. They actually send someone to the emergency room every three minutes (FARE, 2017). The amount of allergic reactions to peanuts is on the rise in America, and many researchers are trying to reduce this number. There are many experiments underway to find better ways to treat allergies and to identify the cause of these allergic reactions, primarily in regards to how a person’s immune system responds to these allergies. However, the purpose of our research is to identify unique molecular genotypes within the peanuts in order to identify whether molecular differences can ultimately lead to identifying what triggers allergic reactions. We performed SDS-PAGE gels on 109 different peanut genotypes and examined their banding patterns. From these gels, we were able to identify a common banding pattern, and found 20 special genotypes that differed from those patterns. Differences could mean lighter bands, missing bands, or bands that were in different locations-higher or lower than usual. These 20 special genotypes will go to Clemson campus so they can be observed further. From them, we can find their amino acid sequence to find what causes those genotypes to be possibly allergenic. After that, we can alter those sequences and create new, hypoallergenic peanuts that are safer. Hopefully these modified peanuts will help decrease the amount of allergic reactions to peanuts in the United States and around the world.

Location

Neville 105

Start Date

4-14-2018 11:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 11:45 AM

Sifting Germplasm to Identify Hypoallergenic Peanut Genotypes: Gaining Ammunitions for Future Breeding

Neville 105

A prevalent and increasing issue in the world is peanut allergies. Allergic reactions can range anywhere from minor to deadly. They actually send someone to the emergency room every three minutes (FARE, 2017). The amount of allergic reactions to peanuts is on the rise in America, and many researchers are trying to reduce this number. There are many experiments underway to find better ways to treat allergies and to identify the cause of these allergic reactions, primarily in regards to how a person’s immune system responds to these allergies. However, the purpose of our research is to identify unique molecular genotypes within the peanuts in order to identify whether molecular differences can ultimately lead to identifying what triggers allergic reactions. We performed SDS-PAGE gels on 109 different peanut genotypes and examined their banding patterns. From these gels, we were able to identify a common banding pattern, and found 20 special genotypes that differed from those patterns. Differences could mean lighter bands, missing bands, or bands that were in different locations-higher or lower than usual. These 20 special genotypes will go to Clemson campus so they can be observed further. From them, we can find their amino acid sequence to find what causes those genotypes to be possibly allergenic. After that, we can alter those sequences and create new, hypoallergenic peanuts that are safer. Hopefully these modified peanuts will help decrease the amount of allergic reactions to peanuts in the United States and around the world.