Title

Nutritional Content in Organic vs Inorganic Vegetables

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Chemistry

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to determine if there is a nutritional difference in organic vs inorganic vegetables. The tested vegetables were green beans, brussels sprouts, broccoli, carrots, and asparagus. Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins were tested by four reagent tests: Benedict's, Lugol’s, Biuret, and Sudan IV. The energy content was found using a homemade calorimeter. The hypothesis for this project states that if vegetables are compared between organic and inorganic, there will be a difference between the amount of calories, carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. If there is a difference between organic and inorganic, then inorganic will contain more calories, fats, carbs, and proteins. The null hypothesis stated that if vegetables are compared between organic and inorganic, there will be no difference in calories, carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. The results of this study supported the hypothesis because the inorganic vegetables contained more calories than the organic vegetables (in all cases except for the carrot in which the organic vegetables contain more calories). This experiment will benefit consumers, because it will inform then whether or not to buy organic vegetables.

Location

Neville 106

Start Date

4-14-2018 1:30 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 1:30 PM

Nutritional Content in Organic vs Inorganic Vegetables

Neville 106

The purpose of this study is to determine if there is a nutritional difference in organic vs inorganic vegetables. The tested vegetables were green beans, brussels sprouts, broccoli, carrots, and asparagus. Carbohydrates, fats, and proteins were tested by four reagent tests: Benedict's, Lugol’s, Biuret, and Sudan IV. The energy content was found using a homemade calorimeter. The hypothesis for this project states that if vegetables are compared between organic and inorganic, there will be a difference between the amount of calories, carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. If there is a difference between organic and inorganic, then inorganic will contain more calories, fats, carbs, and proteins. The null hypothesis stated that if vegetables are compared between organic and inorganic, there will be no difference in calories, carbohydrates, proteins, and fats. The results of this study supported the hypothesis because the inorganic vegetables contained more calories than the organic vegetables (in all cases except for the carrot in which the organic vegetables contain more calories). This experiment will benefit consumers, because it will inform then whether or not to buy organic vegetables.