Title

The Effect of Changing Wind Speed on the Amount of Voltage Produced from a Wind Belt

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

In this experiment, a scaled model of a wind belt, a mechanism used to harness wind energy, was built and tested at 5 different wind speeds in order to find the relation between wind speed and voltage produced. The independent variable was wind speed and the dependent variable was voltage produced. The hypothesis was, if wind speed increases, then the voltage produced will increase. The null hypothesis was, if wind speed increases, then there will be no increase in the voltage produced. The voltage was first run through a full wave bridge rectifier in order to change it from alternating current to direct current, then through a 470µf smoothing capacitor and a 100KΩ resistor to create a steady, constant voltage output. The results of this experiment supported the hypothesis and showed that there is a linear relation between wind speed and voltage, meaning a wind belt, on a larger scale, could be an efficient alternate way to harness wind energy.

Location

Lassiter 119

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:00 AM

The Effect of Changing Wind Speed on the Amount of Voltage Produced from a Wind Belt

Lassiter 119

In this experiment, a scaled model of a wind belt, a mechanism used to harness wind energy, was built and tested at 5 different wind speeds in order to find the relation between wind speed and voltage produced. The independent variable was wind speed and the dependent variable was voltage produced. The hypothesis was, if wind speed increases, then the voltage produced will increase. The null hypothesis was, if wind speed increases, then there will be no increase in the voltage produced. The voltage was first run through a full wave bridge rectifier in order to change it from alternating current to direct current, then through a 470µf smoothing capacitor and a 100KΩ resistor to create a steady, constant voltage output. The results of this experiment supported the hypothesis and showed that there is a linear relation between wind speed and voltage, meaning a wind belt, on a larger scale, could be an efficient alternate way to harness wind energy.