Title

The Effect of Water Filtration on Terrain

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this project was to determine the effect different methods, with a focus on terrains, with respect to water and its filtration. Four methods of filtration were used in this experiment: a grassy terrain, a sand and gravel filled terrain, a dirt terrain with plastic and trash throughout, and a Brita® filter. Water was first collected from a rain water pond in five different bottles. The water was then tested for dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH levels. Then, water from each bottle was filtered through each terrain and filter. They were then tested for dissolved oxygen and pH after filtration. The independent variable was the filtration method and the dependent variable was the DO and pH levels. The hypothesis is if the terrain has nutrients and plants, then the water will have lower levels of dissolved oxygen and pH. The null hypothesis is if the terrain has nutrients and plants, then the water will not have lower levels of dissolved oxygen and pH. The results of this experiment are statistically insignificant. However, the difference in pH levels before and after the plastic terrain and sandy terrain are notable. No filter works significantly best to clean the pond water. In conclusion, neither terrain or Brita® worked better to clean the water.

Location

Lassiter 220

Start Date

4-14-2018 11:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 11:00 AM

The Effect of Water Filtration on Terrain

Lassiter 220

The purpose of this project was to determine the effect different methods, with a focus on terrains, with respect to water and its filtration. Four methods of filtration were used in this experiment: a grassy terrain, a sand and gravel filled terrain, a dirt terrain with plastic and trash throughout, and a Brita® filter. Water was first collected from a rain water pond in five different bottles. The water was then tested for dissolved oxygen (DO) and pH levels. Then, water from each bottle was filtered through each terrain and filter. They were then tested for dissolved oxygen and pH after filtration. The independent variable was the filtration method and the dependent variable was the DO and pH levels. The hypothesis is if the terrain has nutrients and plants, then the water will have lower levels of dissolved oxygen and pH. The null hypothesis is if the terrain has nutrients and plants, then the water will not have lower levels of dissolved oxygen and pH. The results of this experiment are statistically insignificant. However, the difference in pH levels before and after the plastic terrain and sandy terrain are notable. No filter works significantly best to clean the pond water. In conclusion, neither terrain or Brita® worked better to clean the water.