Title

The Effect of Copper and Sorbic Acid on Ampicillin-Resistant Bacteria

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

9th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

This experiment was conducted to research the effects of transition metals and organic acids on antibacterial resistant Escherichia coli bacteria using copper sulfate, sorbic acid, and ampicillin resistant E.coli by mixing 12g of CuSO₄ and 2.8g sorbic acid into 500mL of nutrient agar, and growing the ampicillin resistant E.coli on petri dishes with the CuSO₄+Sorbic acid and some with plain nutrient agar. The independent variable (IV) in this study was the CuSO₄+Sorbic agar used in some of the plates, and the dependent variable (DV) was the number of colonies that grew on each plate. The hypothesis was if ampicillin resistant E.coli is grown in a petri dish with copper sulfate and sorbic acid added into the agar, then the bacteria will not grow. The results indicate the plates with the CuSO₄+sorbic acid experienced almost one third of bacterial colony growth the plates without CuSO₄+sorbic acid, and had no visible colonies. These results seem to support the hypothesis, but the bacterial colony counter phone app called “Colony Counter” that over counted the number of colonies in the the CuSO₄+sorbic acid plates. The reason why the the bacterial colony counter counted nonexistent bacteria is because the sorbic acid mixed into the agar did not fully dissolve (either because of over saturation or poor mixing), and solidified with white speckles dispersed in the agar that colony counter mistook as colonies.

Location

Neville 221

Start Date

4-14-2018 10:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 10:00 AM

The Effect of Copper and Sorbic Acid on Ampicillin-Resistant Bacteria

Neville 221

This experiment was conducted to research the effects of transition metals and organic acids on antibacterial resistant Escherichia coli bacteria using copper sulfate, sorbic acid, and ampicillin resistant E.coli by mixing 12g of CuSO₄ and 2.8g sorbic acid into 500mL of nutrient agar, and growing the ampicillin resistant E.coli on petri dishes with the CuSO₄+Sorbic acid and some with plain nutrient agar. The independent variable (IV) in this study was the CuSO₄+Sorbic agar used in some of the plates, and the dependent variable (DV) was the number of colonies that grew on each plate. The hypothesis was if ampicillin resistant E.coli is grown in a petri dish with copper sulfate and sorbic acid added into the agar, then the bacteria will not grow. The results indicate the plates with the CuSO₄+sorbic acid experienced almost one third of bacterial colony growth the plates without CuSO₄+sorbic acid, and had no visible colonies. These results seem to support the hypothesis, but the bacterial colony counter phone app called “Colony Counter” that over counted the number of colonies in the the CuSO₄+sorbic acid plates. The reason why the the bacterial colony counter counted nonexistent bacteria is because the sorbic acid mixed into the agar did not fully dissolve (either because of over saturation or poor mixing), and solidified with white speckles dispersed in the agar that colony counter mistook as colonies.