Title

Simulated Driving with Distractions

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this study is to compare driving under the influence of alcohol to driving under the influence of texting to determine while results in more errors. The stated hypothesis for this study is that: the number of mistakes a teen driver makes will be higher when the teen drives under the influence of alcohol, then when they drive under the influence of texting. To begin each of the twenty students took a fifteen point survey then began testing. Each subject was given a two minute practice run, to get to know the simulator, then they were tested on the same track three different times with a different distraction each trial. The first trial was with no distractions, the second was while texting responses to five different questions and the third trial was while wearing beer goggles that simulated having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .10 to .17. A total of 477 mistakes were made throughout the entire 20 subjects. Onced averaged together out of 100 the average percent for the baseline was 50.16%, for texting it was 23.61% and for drunk driving it was 11.63%. From these results the hypothesis that driving under the influence of alcohol would cause more distractions than driving while texting is proved correct.

Location

Neville 321

Start Date

4-14-2018 12:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 12:00 PM

Simulated Driving with Distractions

Neville 321

The purpose of this study is to compare driving under the influence of alcohol to driving under the influence of texting to determine while results in more errors. The stated hypothesis for this study is that: the number of mistakes a teen driver makes will be higher when the teen drives under the influence of alcohol, then when they drive under the influence of texting. To begin each of the twenty students took a fifteen point survey then began testing. Each subject was given a two minute practice run, to get to know the simulator, then they were tested on the same track three different times with a different distraction each trial. The first trial was with no distractions, the second was while texting responses to five different questions and the third trial was while wearing beer goggles that simulated having a blood alcohol concentration (BAC) of .10 to .17. A total of 477 mistakes were made throughout the entire 20 subjects. Onced averaged together out of 100 the average percent for the baseline was 50.16%, for texting it was 23.61% and for drunk driving it was 11.63%. From these results the hypothesis that driving under the influence of alcohol would cause more distractions than driving while texting is proved correct.