The Effect of Light and Shaking on the Mimosa Pudica Response Time in Order to Understand Memory Retention

McKenna Wright, SVHS

early slot ….

Abstract

The Mimosa Pudica is a common plant that is known as the tickle me plant. In this research, its purpose was to help develop a deeper understanding into the biology of plant species and their adaption patterns. By using different light intensities, and a consistent sensation, adaptation is able to be looked at directly. It was hypothesized that the higher the light intensity, the easier it would be for the Mimosa Pudica to remember that the shaker plate is not harmful to them. To test this hypothesis, 40 plants split into two groups of twenty and placed in environments with different light intensities as described as high and low. Everyday for two weeks, the plants were tested with the same sensation to see if it would close its leaves. After this the plants were given a one week rest and then testing resumed with two more weeks and data was collected. In the end, the Mimosa Pudica did support the hypothesis in that the plants were able to adapt and those in the high intensity adapted easier. After using an unstacked ANOVA the data was deemed significant with a 90 percent confidence level.

 
Apr 14th, 10:00 AM

The Effect of Light and Shaking on the Mimosa Pudica Response Time in Order to Understand Memory Retention

Neville 105

The Mimosa Pudica is a common plant that is known as the tickle me plant. In this research, its purpose was to help develop a deeper understanding into the biology of plant species and their adaption patterns. By using different light intensities, and a consistent sensation, adaptation is able to be looked at directly. It was hypothesized that the higher the light intensity, the easier it would be for the Mimosa Pudica to remember that the shaker plate is not harmful to them. To test this hypothesis, 40 plants split into two groups of twenty and placed in environments with different light intensities as described as high and low. Everyday for two weeks, the plants were tested with the same sensation to see if it would close its leaves. After this the plants were given a one week rest and then testing resumed with two more weeks and data was collected. In the end, the Mimosa Pudica did support the hypothesis in that the plants were able to adapt and those in the high intensity adapted easier. After using an unstacked ANOVA the data was deemed significant with a 90 percent confidence level.