The Efficiency of Modified Resveratrol on In Vitro Human Endothelial Tissue

Kendall Cole, GSSM

Abstract

There is a general problem with the majority of chemotherapy drugs that while they may kill a large majority of cancer cells in a semi-targeted manner, many of which often end up killing the healthy, non-metastatic cells as well. Searches are being made to find a new chemotherapy or immunotherapy solution that kills the cancerous cells while keeping the normal functioning cells alive and healthy. Recent studies have shown that Resveratrol (3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene), a compound found in grapes, mulberries and other berries, could provide an alternative to typical chemotherapy drugs because of its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we observe the effects of modified types of Resveratrol on glioblastomas and Mouse Cardiac Endothelial Cells to determine which is most effective in damaging or killing the glioblastoma cells while leaving the endothelial cells as alive and healthy as possible.

 
Apr 14th, 9:15 AM

The Efficiency of Modified Resveratrol on In Vitro Human Endothelial Tissue

Neville theater

There is a general problem with the majority of chemotherapy drugs that while they may kill a large majority of cancer cells in a semi-targeted manner, many of which often end up killing the healthy, non-metastatic cells as well. Searches are being made to find a new chemotherapy or immunotherapy solution that kills the cancerous cells while keeping the normal functioning cells alive and healthy. Recent studies have shown that Resveratrol (3,5,4’-trihydroxystilbene), a compound found in grapes, mulberries and other berries, could provide an alternative to typical chemotherapy drugs because of its anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we observe the effects of modified types of Resveratrol on glioblastomas and Mouse Cardiac Endothelial Cells to determine which is most effective in damaging or killing the glioblastoma cells while leaving the endothelial cells as alive and healthy as possible.