Title

The effect of Li2CO3 electrolyte concentration on ARLB performance

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Energy storage devices are in great demand in the 21st century, and Aqueous Rechargeable Lithium Batteries (ARLBs) are promising ways to meet that demand. ARLBs differ from traditional Lithium-ion batteries in their electrolyte which is a lithium containing aqueous solution as opposed to an organic solution. The purpose of this experiment is to determine whether Li2CO3 is a feasible electrolyte and to determine its optimal concentration. It was hypothesized that the voltage produced by a battery using 1M Li2CO3 as electrolyte would be statistically greater than the voltage produced by a battery using 0.1M Li2CO3 as electrolyte at alpha = 0.05. The average values recorded for 0.1M Li2CO3 and 1.0M Li2CO3 are (M = 0.18V) and (M = 0.202V) respectively. Because of the recorded voltages were small and Li2CO3 is only partially soluble in water, it was concluded that Li2CO3 was not a promising electrolyte material.

Location

Lassiter 119

Start Date

4-14-2018 11:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 11:30 AM

The effect of Li2CO3 electrolyte concentration on ARLB performance

Lassiter 119

Energy storage devices are in great demand in the 21st century, and Aqueous Rechargeable Lithium Batteries (ARLBs) are promising ways to meet that demand. ARLBs differ from traditional Lithium-ion batteries in their electrolyte which is a lithium containing aqueous solution as opposed to an organic solution. The purpose of this experiment is to determine whether Li2CO3 is a feasible electrolyte and to determine its optimal concentration. It was hypothesized that the voltage produced by a battery using 1M Li2CO3 as electrolyte would be statistically greater than the voltage produced by a battery using 0.1M Li2CO3 as electrolyte at alpha = 0.05. The average values recorded for 0.1M Li2CO3 and 1.0M Li2CO3 are (M = 0.18V) and (M = 0.202V) respectively. Because of the recorded voltages were small and Li2CO3 is only partially soluble in water, it was concluded that Li2CO3 was not a promising electrolyte material.