Title

The effect of sodium hypochlorite on the heart rate of Daphnia magna

Author(s)

Siri Avula, SVHS

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Written Paper Award

3rd Place

Abstract

Disinfectants are ubiquitously being used to disinfect water systems for purification purposes, however, this may put the lives of aquatic organisms living in these water sources at risk. The purpose of this research study was to determine how certain concentrations of a disinfectant, sodium hypochlorite, could affect the lives of Daphnia magna. It was hypothesized that if the Daphnia magna were exposed to certain concentrations (½ ppm, 1 ppm, 2 ppm, or 4 ppm) of sodium hypochlorite, for 24 hours, then the organism would have an abnormal heart rate that was higher or lower than usual. Fifty D. magna were submerged in different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite to test which concentrations these organisms could survive within. After twenty-four hours, the heart rate of each Daphnia magna was observed and recorded. The mean heart rates for each of the concentrations were compared using a one-way ANOVA [F(4,45)=2.43, p=0.061], which indicated no statistical significance in the heart rates of the D. magna. Despite the determination that the exposure to concentrations of sodium hypochlorite was insignificant, the health of the organisms was still negatively impacted, with multiple organisms that suffered, and even died, within the concentrations of sodium hypochlorite greater than 2 ppm.

Location

Lassiter 220

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:30 AM

The effect of sodium hypochlorite on the heart rate of Daphnia magna

Lassiter 220

Disinfectants are ubiquitously being used to disinfect water systems for purification purposes, however, this may put the lives of aquatic organisms living in these water sources at risk. The purpose of this research study was to determine how certain concentrations of a disinfectant, sodium hypochlorite, could affect the lives of Daphnia magna. It was hypothesized that if the Daphnia magna were exposed to certain concentrations (½ ppm, 1 ppm, 2 ppm, or 4 ppm) of sodium hypochlorite, for 24 hours, then the organism would have an abnormal heart rate that was higher or lower than usual. Fifty D. magna were submerged in different concentrations of sodium hypochlorite to test which concentrations these organisms could survive within. After twenty-four hours, the heart rate of each Daphnia magna was observed and recorded. The mean heart rates for each of the concentrations were compared using a one-way ANOVA [F(4,45)=2.43, p=0.061], which indicated no statistical significance in the heart rates of the D. magna. Despite the determination that the exposure to concentrations of sodium hypochlorite was insignificant, the health of the organisms was still negatively impacted, with multiple organisms that suffered, and even died, within the concentrations of sodium hypochlorite greater than 2 ppm.