Title

The effects of naturally modeled acidic conditions on the growth of the phytoplankton Gymnodinium

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Ocean acidification over the past decade has become a global issue. It affects many marine organisms that utilize calcium carbonate shells or skeletons. These organisms are at risk from the increased carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, which results in decreased pH of seawater (Edmunds et al., 2016). As a result, many reef-building corals have lost the ability to produce their own skeletons. Australian researchers show that 67% of the northern reef’s have died (Life and death after Great Barrier Reef bleaching, 2016). This experiments purpose was to determine the effects of ocean acidification on the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium to show the impact of ocean acidification on the whole marine ecosystem. Plankton may seem insignificant, yet they are an essential part of the marine food web as an energy source to consumers. It was hypothesized that Gymnodinium grown in regular ocean water pH would have a greater absorbance at 530 nm than Gymnodinium grown in more acidic conditions. First the solutions were made, with both group’s solutions being distributed to 10 test tubes each and placed under the light bar for one week. After the week, the final absorbance was measured at 530 nm using a Spectrovis and was recorded. Then the final absorbance was subtracted from the initial absorbance to give the change in absorbance. A T-test determined the values were insignificant, as p>�=0.05 (T=1.79 p=.107). The hypothesis was not supported because the test yielded insignificant results.

Location

Lassiter 222

Start Date

4-14-2018 11:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 11:45 AM

The effects of naturally modeled acidic conditions on the growth of the phytoplankton Gymnodinium

Lassiter 222

Ocean acidification over the past decade has become a global issue. It affects many marine organisms that utilize calcium carbonate shells or skeletons. These organisms are at risk from the increased carbon dioxide (CO2) levels, which results in decreased pH of seawater (Edmunds et al., 2016). As a result, many reef-building corals have lost the ability to produce their own skeletons. Australian researchers show that 67% of the northern reef’s have died (Life and death after Great Barrier Reef bleaching, 2016). This experiments purpose was to determine the effects of ocean acidification on the dinoflagellate Gymnodinium to show the impact of ocean acidification on the whole marine ecosystem. Plankton may seem insignificant, yet they are an essential part of the marine food web as an energy source to consumers. It was hypothesized that Gymnodinium grown in regular ocean water pH would have a greater absorbance at 530 nm than Gymnodinium grown in more acidic conditions. First the solutions were made, with both group’s solutions being distributed to 10 test tubes each and placed under the light bar for one week. After the week, the final absorbance was measured at 530 nm using a Spectrovis and was recorded. Then the final absorbance was subtracted from the initial absorbance to give the change in absorbance. A T-test determined the values were insignificant, as p>�=0.05 (T=1.79 p=.107). The hypothesis was not supported because the test yielded insignificant results.