Title

Novel Mosquito Trap: The Use of Acoustics and Olfaction to Attract Male Mosquitoes

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Mosquitoes are a major concern to human health because they can serve as vectors to pass agents that cause diseases, such as malaria or the Zika virus, with a multitude of harmful side effects, like seizures, coma or death. Different commercial mosquitocidal agents exist, but the overuse of them have caused mosquitoes to develop resistance. To help reduce mosquito populations, non-chemical mosquito traps can be created with the use of olfaction and acoustics to attract the mosquitoes. The purpose of this experiment was to test various methods to attract, trap, and kill mosquitoes. It was hypothesized that if an acoustic test, an olfaction test, and an acoustic and olfaction test are used as a mean to attract adult male mosquitoes into a trap, the acoustic and olfaction test would be the most effective. It was also hypothesized that out of a range of 200 to 600 Hz, the frequency that would best attract mosquitoes would in the range of 300-500 Hz and that when comparing extracts of Agaricus bisporus, Musa acuminate, and a control, the A. bisporus extract would best attract adult male mosquitoes. Culex quinquefasciatus were used as the model mosquito, and steam distillation was used to create the A. bisporus and M. acuminate extracts. For the olfaction test, mosquitoes were introduced to tubes with filter paper on one end and filter paper soaked in an extract on the other end, and for the acoustic test, speakers were set on each side of the tube and emitted various sound frequencies. Movement of the mosquitoes was observed. One way ANOVAs and post-hoc Tukey tests were conducted, and it was found that there was a significant difference between the following treatment trials and the control: 500 Hz, 400 Hz, and 300 Hz (F(5,114)=13.44, p<0.001); the mushroom and banana (F(2,57)=12.162, p<0.001); and the 400 Hz/mushroom, 0 Hz/mushroom and 400 Hz/DI H2O (F(3,76)=7.145, p<0.0001). Thus, the hypothesis was supported. Sounds of frequency 300 to 500 Hz and the smell of the mushrooms and the bananas were effective attractants. Since a combination of the A. bisporus extract and a sound frequency of 400 Hz was the most effective attractant, a natural mosquito trap utilizing these could be developed as a potential commercial product.

Location

Lassiter 220

Start Date

4-14-2018 11:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 11:45 AM

Novel Mosquito Trap: The Use of Acoustics and Olfaction to Attract Male Mosquitoes

Lassiter 220

Mosquitoes are a major concern to human health because they can serve as vectors to pass agents that cause diseases, such as malaria or the Zika virus, with a multitude of harmful side effects, like seizures, coma or death. Different commercial mosquitocidal agents exist, but the overuse of them have caused mosquitoes to develop resistance. To help reduce mosquito populations, non-chemical mosquito traps can be created with the use of olfaction and acoustics to attract the mosquitoes. The purpose of this experiment was to test various methods to attract, trap, and kill mosquitoes. It was hypothesized that if an acoustic test, an olfaction test, and an acoustic and olfaction test are used as a mean to attract adult male mosquitoes into a trap, the acoustic and olfaction test would be the most effective. It was also hypothesized that out of a range of 200 to 600 Hz, the frequency that would best attract mosquitoes would in the range of 300-500 Hz and that when comparing extracts of Agaricus bisporus, Musa acuminate, and a control, the A. bisporus extract would best attract adult male mosquitoes. Culex quinquefasciatus were used as the model mosquito, and steam distillation was used to create the A. bisporus and M. acuminate extracts. For the olfaction test, mosquitoes were introduced to tubes with filter paper on one end and filter paper soaked in an extract on the other end, and for the acoustic test, speakers were set on each side of the tube and emitted various sound frequencies. Movement of the mosquitoes was observed. One way ANOVAs and post-hoc Tukey tests were conducted, and it was found that there was a significant difference between the following treatment trials and the control: 500 Hz, 400 Hz, and 300 Hz (F(5,114)=13.44, p<0.001); the mushroom and banana (F(2,57)=12.162, p<0.001); and the 400 Hz/mushroom, 0 Hz/mushroom and 400 Hz/DI H2O (F(3,76)=7.145, p<0.0001). Thus, the hypothesis was supported. Sounds of frequency 300 to 500 Hz and the smell of the mushrooms and the bananas were effective attractants. Since a combination of the A. bisporus extract and a sound frequency of 400 Hz was the most effective attractant, a natural mosquito trap utilizing these could be developed as a potential commercial product.