Title

The effect of Bisphenol A on the mating behaviors of Gryllodes sigillatus

Author(s)

Fatima Jatoi, SVHS

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical commonly used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Many organisms, including humans, are constantly exposed to this chemical, which in past studies was found to affect the reproductive system. Some of BPA’s effects are still unknown, such as its effects on mating behavior. As such, the purpose of this study was to test the effects of BPA on the mating behaviors of male Gryllodes sigillatus (crickets). It was hypothesized that the male crickets exposed to BPA would have a decreased mating interest, as evinced by a lower number of chirps in a one minute time span than crickets not exposed to BPA. The experiment was conducted using two groups of male crickets, one exposed to BPA and the other not. After 24 hours, each male cricket was placed with twenty female crickets, and the number of times the cricket chirped in one minute was counted. All crickets were then tested for the presence of BPA. A t-test found that crickets that were exposed to BPA chirped significantly less than crickets that were not, t(18)=3.38, p<0.05. Thus, it is likely that BPA, being an endocrine disruptor, disrupted the crickets’ ecdysteroids, the sex hormones in insects, causing the male crickets to be less attracted to the females, thus chirping less. Since crickets are a model organism for human behavior, this study may imply hat BPA affects human mating behaviors as well.

Location

Lassiter 222

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:15 AM

The effect of Bisphenol A on the mating behaviors of Gryllodes sigillatus

Lassiter 222

Bisphenol A (BPA) is a chemical commonly used in polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resins. Many organisms, including humans, are constantly exposed to this chemical, which in past studies was found to affect the reproductive system. Some of BPA’s effects are still unknown, such as its effects on mating behavior. As such, the purpose of this study was to test the effects of BPA on the mating behaviors of male Gryllodes sigillatus (crickets). It was hypothesized that the male crickets exposed to BPA would have a decreased mating interest, as evinced by a lower number of chirps in a one minute time span than crickets not exposed to BPA. The experiment was conducted using two groups of male crickets, one exposed to BPA and the other not. After 24 hours, each male cricket was placed with twenty female crickets, and the number of times the cricket chirped in one minute was counted. All crickets were then tested for the presence of BPA. A t-test found that crickets that were exposed to BPA chirped significantly less than crickets that were not, t(18)=3.38, p<0.05. Thus, it is likely that BPA, being an endocrine disruptor, disrupted the crickets’ ecdysteroids, the sex hormones in insects, causing the male crickets to be less attracted to the females, thus chirping less. Since crickets are a model organism for human behavior, this study may imply hat BPA affects human mating behaviors as well.