Title

The effect of Pseudomonas putida on the degradation of oil in saltwater and freshwater environments

Author(s)

Annie Lobitz, SVHS

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Bioremediation is a method used to clean up environmental contaminants in a more environmentally friendly and cheaper method compared to using manual labor or machinery. The contaminants could be oil or other potentially harmful chemicals, and they can be detrimental to ecosystems by killing certain species, enhancing the growth of other species, etc. Microorganisms such as bacteria, plants, or fungi can be used to degrade these contaminants by digesting them and converting them into less harmful substances. In this particular study, the bacterial species Pseudomonas putida was studied to see if it has bioremediation abilities in both a saltwater environment and a freshwater environment. The bacteria were grown in the same conditions (i.e. temperature, light, and moisture), but one group had approximately six grams to simulate ocean water. The groups were plated and oil was added onto the samples and left for 48 hours. The samples were then poured into test tubes to measure how much oil was left over after the testing period. The results support the hypothesis which was that the freshwater group would degrade the oil more than the saltwater group. Using an ANOVA and post-hoc tukey statistical tests, the results were significant. This research adds to to the growing field involving bioremediation.

Location

Lassiter 220

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:15 AM

The effect of Pseudomonas putida on the degradation of oil in saltwater and freshwater environments

Lassiter 220

Bioremediation is a method used to clean up environmental contaminants in a more environmentally friendly and cheaper method compared to using manual labor or machinery. The contaminants could be oil or other potentially harmful chemicals, and they can be detrimental to ecosystems by killing certain species, enhancing the growth of other species, etc. Microorganisms such as bacteria, plants, or fungi can be used to degrade these contaminants by digesting them and converting them into less harmful substances. In this particular study, the bacterial species Pseudomonas putida was studied to see if it has bioremediation abilities in both a saltwater environment and a freshwater environment. The bacteria were grown in the same conditions (i.e. temperature, light, and moisture), but one group had approximately six grams to simulate ocean water. The groups were plated and oil was added onto the samples and left for 48 hours. The samples were then poured into test tubes to measure how much oil was left over after the testing period. The results support the hypothesis which was that the freshwater group would degrade the oil more than the saltwater group. Using an ANOVA and post-hoc tukey statistical tests, the results were significant. This research adds to to the growing field involving bioremediation.