Title

The effect of varying magnesium nitrate and temperature levels on the growth of Chlorella sp.

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Abstract

The impending depletion of nonrenewable energy sources has resulted in worldwide research for new, renewable resources. Biofuels are an emerging source of energy that utilize the carbohydrates of biomass such as algae and palm trees. This research was aimed at improving the growth of Chlorella sp. for purposes of biofuel production. It was hypothesized that a larger magnesium nitrate concentration and room temperature conditions would most increase the growth of Chlorella sp. A homogenous Chlorella sp. solution was equally distributed among 30 Erlenmeyer flasks already containing 120 mL of distilled water. An equal number of 15 mg, 5 mg, and 0 mg magnesium nitrate treatments were created. Half of the treatments were exposed to room temperature and half to 35℃. After 11 days, the algae were separated from the solution through filtration. There were significant differences, F(5,22)=22.25, p<0.001, in mass between the high nutrient and low nutrient treatments, the low nutrient and controlled treatments, and the high nutrient and controlled treatments. A Scheffe test determined that there was no significant difference between the means of the different temperature treatments. These results suggest that certain nutrients, especially nitrates and phosphates, can be used to increase the growth of algae for the purpose of biofuel production.

Location

Neville 221

Start Date

4-14-2018 11:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 11:15 AM

The effect of varying magnesium nitrate and temperature levels on the growth of Chlorella sp.

Neville 221

The impending depletion of nonrenewable energy sources has resulted in worldwide research for new, renewable resources. Biofuels are an emerging source of energy that utilize the carbohydrates of biomass such as algae and palm trees. This research was aimed at improving the growth of Chlorella sp. for purposes of biofuel production. It was hypothesized that a larger magnesium nitrate concentration and room temperature conditions would most increase the growth of Chlorella sp. A homogenous Chlorella sp. solution was equally distributed among 30 Erlenmeyer flasks already containing 120 mL of distilled water. An equal number of 15 mg, 5 mg, and 0 mg magnesium nitrate treatments were created. Half of the treatments were exposed to room temperature and half to 35℃. After 11 days, the algae were separated from the solution through filtration. There were significant differences, F(5,22)=22.25, p<0.001, in mass between the high nutrient and low nutrient treatments, the low nutrient and controlled treatments, and the high nutrient and controlled treatments. A Scheffe test determined that there was no significant difference between the means of the different temperature treatments. These results suggest that certain nutrients, especially nitrates and phosphates, can be used to increase the growth of algae for the purpose of biofuel production.