Title

The effect of skate blade sharpness on the coefficient of friction of ice

Author(s)

Dalton Arndt, SVHS

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physics

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Ice skates are a very important tool to those who play ice hockey. Ice skates can be sharpened many different ways but the most common are ⅜, ½, and flat (goalie cut). It is commonly believed that the deeper the hollow on the skate the greater stop ability occurs. In this experiment a ⅜, ½, and flat skates were used in order to see if the friction between the skates and the ice helped create this stopping power. The hypothesis for this experiment was that the amount of friction would not be dependent upon the sharpness of the skate blade. In this experiment two skates were held together using a threaded rod and the threaded rod was held between the skates with nuts and washers. In order to keep the skates parallel, in order to reduce error, a parallel piece of steel was placed in between the skates. Then the skates were pulled 60.26 cm (2 feet) in one direction and the average amount of newtons it took to move that distance was recorded. When the results were collected and analyzed using a one way ANOVA it was found that there was a significant difference between each of the three skates at an α=0.01, F(2, 87)=172.05, p<0.01.

Location

Neville 306

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:30 AM

The effect of skate blade sharpness on the coefficient of friction of ice

Neville 306

Ice skates are a very important tool to those who play ice hockey. Ice skates can be sharpened many different ways but the most common are ⅜, ½, and flat (goalie cut). It is commonly believed that the deeper the hollow on the skate the greater stop ability occurs. In this experiment a ⅜, ½, and flat skates were used in order to see if the friction between the skates and the ice helped create this stopping power. The hypothesis for this experiment was that the amount of friction would not be dependent upon the sharpness of the skate blade. In this experiment two skates were held together using a threaded rod and the threaded rod was held between the skates with nuts and washers. In order to keep the skates parallel, in order to reduce error, a parallel piece of steel was placed in between the skates. Then the skates were pulled 60.26 cm (2 feet) in one direction and the average amount of newtons it took to move that distance was recorded. When the results were collected and analyzed using a one way ANOVA it was found that there was a significant difference between each of the three skates at an α=0.01, F(2, 87)=172.05, p<0.01.