Title

The effect of photo taking on student visual and auditory memory of material presented

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Parents and teachers struggle with coming up with ways to improve students long-term retention about what they learn in class. Many studies show that taking pictures of certain things people experience in life help with memorization. This experiment, in particular, focused on the effect of students taking photos on material they learn on their memorization skills -- testing whether or not taking pictures boosts their visual and auditory memory on the material. It was hypothesized that the students would remember more about what they learned and took pictures of than the ones they did not take pictures of. 26 high school students participated, where they watched a slideshow presenting eight animals, providing them with a picture of each animal and a video that gave two short facts for each. The students then took photos of the first four presented animals. Three days later, the students came back and took a short quiz, testing them on the animals they learned from the presentation. The quiz showed how the students did on the questions of the animals they took pictures of and the ones they did not take pictures of. A Two-Sample T-Test was performed to compare the two groups. The statistical test revealed that there was a significant difference between the means, with a t-value=2.34 and p-value=0.023, p<α (α=0.05). This showed that the students remembered more about the information of the animals they took pictures of than the animals they did not take pictures of.

Location

Neville 321

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:00 AM

The effect of photo taking on student visual and auditory memory of material presented

Neville 321

Parents and teachers struggle with coming up with ways to improve students long-term retention about what they learn in class. Many studies show that taking pictures of certain things people experience in life help with memorization. This experiment, in particular, focused on the effect of students taking photos on material they learn on their memorization skills -- testing whether or not taking pictures boosts their visual and auditory memory on the material. It was hypothesized that the students would remember more about what they learned and took pictures of than the ones they did not take pictures of. 26 high school students participated, where they watched a slideshow presenting eight animals, providing them with a picture of each animal and a video that gave two short facts for each. The students then took photos of the first four presented animals. Three days later, the students came back and took a short quiz, testing them on the animals they learned from the presentation. The quiz showed how the students did on the questions of the animals they took pictures of and the ones they did not take pictures of. A Two-Sample T-Test was performed to compare the two groups. The statistical test revealed that there was a significant difference between the means, with a t-value=2.34 and p-value=0.023, p<α >(α=0.05). This showed that the students remembered more about the information of the animals they took pictures of than the animals they did not take pictures of.