Title

The effect of aluminum on the mechanosensory behavior of C. elegans

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Zoology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a major neurological disease that involves the degradation of dopamine neuron networks within the brain and the accumulation of the alpha-synuclein protein. Although these phenomena are typical of PD patients, it is unknown how they develop. Previous research has led to the hypothesis that environmental factors such as pesticides and heavy metals lead to the onset of PD-like symptoms (Zhou, Wang, and Klaunig, 2013). Thus, aluminum, a metal found in many pieces of cookware and utensils, was analyzed in its soluble form, aluminum nitrate nonahydrate [Al(NO3)3ᐧ9H2O], in order to observe its relation to the onset of mechanosensory impairment in C. elegans. It was hypothesized that exposure to aluminum nitrate would cause the impairment of basal slowing response, measured in body bends per 20 seconds, and a decrease in response to touch stimulus. It was also hypothesized that conditions of C. elegans would worsen over time. Worms were exposed to 0 M, 1.43*10-11 M, or 1.59*10-10 M of aluminum. A positive control of nitric acid was also used. Significant differences were found between the positive control and the 1st and 2nd experimental groups over time (1.43*10-11 M, p= 0.004 , 1.59*10-10 M, p= 0.038), while time had no significant effect on number of body bends within the negative control, the 1st experimental group, and the 2nd experimental group. An ANOVA and Tukey test (ɑ=0.05) pooling data at all timepoints showed that significant differences existed for body bends between 1st experimental group and negative control group worms (p = 0.047). Touch stimulus data analysis indicated that significant differences occurred between the positive control group and the 1st and 2nd experimental groups as well as between the negative control group and the 1st and 2nd experimental groups (p <0.001). These results show that aluminum had a negative effect on C. elegans mechanosensory behavior, as it caused worms to move faster in a bacterial lawn and also demonstrated the lack of response to external stimuli.

Location

Neville 122

Start Date

4-14-2018 10:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 10:15 AM

The effect of aluminum on the mechanosensory behavior of C. elegans

Neville 122

Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a major neurological disease that involves the degradation of dopamine neuron networks within the brain and the accumulation of the alpha-synuclein protein. Although these phenomena are typical of PD patients, it is unknown how they develop. Previous research has led to the hypothesis that environmental factors such as pesticides and heavy metals lead to the onset of PD-like symptoms (Zhou, Wang, and Klaunig, 2013). Thus, aluminum, a metal found in many pieces of cookware and utensils, was analyzed in its soluble form, aluminum nitrate nonahydrate [Al(NO3)3ᐧ9H2O], in order to observe its relation to the onset of mechanosensory impairment in C. elegans. It was hypothesized that exposure to aluminum nitrate would cause the impairment of basal slowing response, measured in body bends per 20 seconds, and a decrease in response to touch stimulus. It was also hypothesized that conditions of C. elegans would worsen over time. Worms were exposed to 0 M, 1.43*10-11 M, or 1.59*10-10 M of aluminum. A positive control of nitric acid was also used. Significant differences were found between the positive control and the 1st and 2nd experimental groups over time (1.43*10-11 M, p= 0.004 , 1.59*10-10 M, p= 0.038), while time had no significant effect on number of body bends within the negative control, the 1st experimental group, and the 2nd experimental group. An ANOVA and Tukey test (ɑ=0.05) pooling data at all timepoints showed that significant differences existed for body bends between 1st experimental group and negative control group worms (p = 0.047). Touch stimulus data analysis indicated that significant differences occurred between the positive control group and the 1st and 2nd experimental groups as well as between the negative control group and the 1st and 2nd experimental groups (p <0.001). These results show that aluminum had a negative effect on C. elegans mechanosensory behavior, as it caused worms to move faster in a bacterial lawn and also demonstrated the lack of response to external stimuli.