The Advantages of Implementing Solar Direct-Current Microgrids

Sarah Yetman, AMHS

Abstract

This study examines the effects of implementation of solar direct-current microgrids on a national and international scale. The purpose of this thesis is to showcase the advantages that would come from full implementation of this system. This objective is accomplished through the statistical analysis of data from an experiment that displayed the concept behind direct-current energy usage and the power loss due to conversions. The researcher collects data for 10 different days, 3 times a day, on the current (amperes) in a converted and unconverted energy system from 2 solar panels. This study finds that the difference in direct-current energy production between a system that went through a conversion from DC to AC and back to DC and a system that remained in DC is statistically significant. From the T-test, the p-value from this experiment is 1.403x10-28 for the null hypothesis. This value is significantly below the accepted significance level of .05. This thesis is able to then apply the difference in the systems to a global energy scale, resulting in a 1.318x1015 kWh difference. The implications of this thesis are to assist anyone considering solar direct-current energy and why it would be most efficient.

 
Apr 14th, 12:00 AM

The Advantages of Implementing Solar Direct-Current Microgrids

This study examines the effects of implementation of solar direct-current microgrids on a national and international scale. The purpose of this thesis is to showcase the advantages that would come from full implementation of this system. This objective is accomplished through the statistical analysis of data from an experiment that displayed the concept behind direct-current energy usage and the power loss due to conversions. The researcher collects data for 10 different days, 3 times a day, on the current (amperes) in a converted and unconverted energy system from 2 solar panels. This study finds that the difference in direct-current energy production between a system that went through a conversion from DC to AC and back to DC and a system that remained in DC is statistically significant. From the T-test, the p-value from this experiment is 1.403x10-28 for the null hypothesis. This value is significantly below the accepted significance level of .05. This thesis is able to then apply the difference in the systems to a global energy scale, resulting in a 1.318x1015 kWh difference. The implications of this thesis are to assist anyone considering solar direct-current energy and why it would be most efficient.