Title

Assistive Technology Pack for Students with Down Syndrome

School Name

Center for Advanced Technical Studies

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Children with Down Syndrome have physical abnormalities such as underdeveloped wrist bones, hypotonia, and co-occurring ADHD that can hinder their productivity in both mainstream and special needs classrooms. In order to counteract some of the abnormalities, a pack of Assistive Technology will be created to assemble to the child's desk. If children with Down Syndrome use the AT pack, then teachers will report "corrected" behavior and claim that the pack was adaptable, easily assembled, adjustable, and requires minimal to no assistance to operate because each component of the AT pack addresses the physical abnormalities in children with Down Syndrome. Teachers will assemble and use the pack (that contains a writing slope with a tablet holder, a tactile footrest, and a tactile seat cover) in their classroom for approximately two weeks. The teacher will then complete a survey for each individual student that addresses the effectiveness of each aspect of the desk and the overall success and usefulness of the product in the classroom. Ideally, the results will prove that the AT pack will improve student improvements and "correct" some of the negative effects of their physical abnormalities. The data will be analyzed using Likert scale. If student performance improves and the surveys yield positive results, it can be concluded that the AT pack lead to those improvements. The implications of these findings would suggest that more teachers should use AT packs in their classrooms to improve student performance. In the future, more children and teachers should be tested and/or surveyed.

Location

Lassiter 118

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:30 AM

Assistive Technology Pack for Students with Down Syndrome

Lassiter 118

Children with Down Syndrome have physical abnormalities such as underdeveloped wrist bones, hypotonia, and co-occurring ADHD that can hinder their productivity in both mainstream and special needs classrooms. In order to counteract some of the abnormalities, a pack of Assistive Technology will be created to assemble to the child's desk. If children with Down Syndrome use the AT pack, then teachers will report "corrected" behavior and claim that the pack was adaptable, easily assembled, adjustable, and requires minimal to no assistance to operate because each component of the AT pack addresses the physical abnormalities in children with Down Syndrome. Teachers will assemble and use the pack (that contains a writing slope with a tablet holder, a tactile footrest, and a tactile seat cover) in their classroom for approximately two weeks. The teacher will then complete a survey for each individual student that addresses the effectiveness of each aspect of the desk and the overall success and usefulness of the product in the classroom. Ideally, the results will prove that the AT pack will improve student improvements and "correct" some of the negative effects of their physical abnormalities. The data will be analyzed using Likert scale. If student performance improves and the surveys yield positive results, it can be concluded that the AT pack lead to those improvements. The implications of these findings would suggest that more teachers should use AT packs in their classrooms to improve student performance. In the future, more children and teachers should be tested and/or surveyed.