Title

Physical Scale Modeling of Tensegrity Robots

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this research experiment was to find a reproducible method for scaling up tensegrity robots physically. Many of the tensegrity robots that have been previously designed have not been prototyped physically. They have only been simulated, due to complications that arise as they get larger. The reason behind this is that complications arise when tensegrity robots begin to get larger; the arms of the robot arms get larger and bulkier, and therefore more power is needed to move the robot. In this research experiment, the ultimate goal was to find a set of parameters that could remain the same over gradually larger models. The parameters that were chosen to be controlled were the bending moment of the tensegrity robot’s arms and the spring constant of the elastic that holds the arms together. Polylactic acid (PLA) was used to create the tensegrity robot’s arms, and a spring constant of 0.6253 kg/s2 was measured. These parameters were used successfully to double the size of the tensegrity robot by keeping constant the ratio of the bending moment of the arm to its elasticity.

Location

Neville 109

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:00 AM

Physical Scale Modeling of Tensegrity Robots

Neville 109

The purpose of this research experiment was to find a reproducible method for scaling up tensegrity robots physically. Many of the tensegrity robots that have been previously designed have not been prototyped physically. They have only been simulated, due to complications that arise as they get larger. The reason behind this is that complications arise when tensegrity robots begin to get larger; the arms of the robot arms get larger and bulkier, and therefore more power is needed to move the robot. In this research experiment, the ultimate goal was to find a set of parameters that could remain the same over gradually larger models. The parameters that were chosen to be controlled were the bending moment of the tensegrity robot’s arms and the spring constant of the elastic that holds the arms together. Polylactic acid (PLA) was used to create the tensegrity robot’s arms, and a spring constant of 0.6253 kg/s2 was measured. These parameters were used successfully to double the size of the tensegrity robot by keeping constant the ratio of the bending moment of the arm to its elasticity.