Title

The Application of PVP-Coated Nanoparticles for Oil Removal from Synthetic Seawater in the Presence and Absence of Fulvic Acid

Author(s)

Jaden Yam, GSSM

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

1st Place

Written Paper Award

3rd Place

Abstract

Oil spills have detrimental effects to marine, animal, and human health. Current oil remediation techniques like in situ burning, dispersants, booms, and skimming are ineffective and may further release harmful substances into the environment. Nanotechnology is working to develop a cost-effective and non-toxic method to aid oil remediation by utilizing magnetic nanoparticles. Iron oxide nanoparticles are magnetic and have a low toxicity. A co-precipitation technique was used to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in ambient temperatures. These nanoparticles were then used to separate MC252 crude oil from synthetic seawater samples under environmentally relevant conditions. Low amounts of Suwannee River fulvic acid (1 ppm) were added to samples in order to simulate conditions in the open ocean. Fulvic acid slightly reduced the oil removal efficiency, decreasing the percentages from 91.9% to 91.0% without and with fulvic acid respectively. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the oil removal efficiency. There was a high oil removal efficiency under environmentally relevant conditions.

Location

Neville 110

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:30 AM

The Application of PVP-Coated Nanoparticles for Oil Removal from Synthetic Seawater in the Presence and Absence of Fulvic Acid

Neville 110

Oil spills have detrimental effects to marine, animal, and human health. Current oil remediation techniques like in situ burning, dispersants, booms, and skimming are ineffective and may further release harmful substances into the environment. Nanotechnology is working to develop a cost-effective and non-toxic method to aid oil remediation by utilizing magnetic nanoparticles. Iron oxide nanoparticles are magnetic and have a low toxicity. A co-precipitation technique was used to synthesize polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated iron oxide nanoparticles in ambient temperatures. These nanoparticles were then used to separate MC252 crude oil from synthetic seawater samples under environmentally relevant conditions. Low amounts of Suwannee River fulvic acid (1 ppm) were added to samples in order to simulate conditions in the open ocean. Fulvic acid slightly reduced the oil removal efficiency, decreasing the percentages from 91.9% to 91.0% without and with fulvic acid respectively. Fluorescence spectroscopy was used to measure the oil removal efficiency. There was a high oil removal efficiency under environmentally relevant conditions.