Title

Refining the Photolithography Procedure for the Use of Measuring Hall Voltages

Author(s)

Ian O'Dell, GSSM

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physics

Presentation Type

Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

3rd Place

Abstract

The purpose of this research was to reduce the time required to perform an experiment that tested the Hall effect under the effects of certain organic compounds. In the experiment, the scientist must bond wires to a thin film of metal and a mounting chip that connects the film to an electromagnet lock-in. My job was to remove the long process of wire bonding from this experiment. To accomplish that job, I was given a wired plate, and was instructed to redesign a Hall bar pattern to fit it, as well as find an efficient way to create the Hall bar. I had to account for the process of photolithography, which included creating a new shadow mask, finding the optimum way to expose the silicon chips on which the Hall bars were placed, while ensuring that they were still usable in the lab. The final results were a much larger Hall bar, shadow masks constructed of ink and metallic paint on transparency sheets, scanned by sweeping light across the sample in strips.

Location

Neville 306

Start Date

4-14-2018 12:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 12:00 PM

Refining the Photolithography Procedure for the Use of Measuring Hall Voltages

Neville 306

The purpose of this research was to reduce the time required to perform an experiment that tested the Hall effect under the effects of certain organic compounds. In the experiment, the scientist must bond wires to a thin film of metal and a mounting chip that connects the film to an electromagnet lock-in. My job was to remove the long process of wire bonding from this experiment. To accomplish that job, I was given a wired plate, and was instructed to redesign a Hall bar pattern to fit it, as well as find an efficient way to create the Hall bar. I had to account for the process of photolithography, which included creating a new shadow mask, finding the optimum way to expose the silicon chips on which the Hall bars were placed, while ensuring that they were still usable in the lab. The final results were a much larger Hall bar, shadow masks constructed of ink and metallic paint on transparency sheets, scanned by sweeping light across the sample in strips.