Title

Indication for Bone Remodeling in the Lateral Aspect of Young White-tailed Deer Distal Femora

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Physiology and Health

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

In this project, we examined the innate stiffness of bone material in the distal lateral femora of young white-tailed deer. We researched this property of bone in order to develop a better understanding of how bone function differs in different regions of the femur. We experimented on this property of bone material by taking small cubic samples of bone and loading them in compression to test their stiffness in all three orientations – axial, transversal, and radial. After testing the stiffness of over thirty cubes, we analyzed our results and compared them to those of previously conducted similar research in the medial region of deer femora to see whether or not bone function differs amongst these two regions. We found that the function does appear to differ, as the results of our study were different than those of the previous research conducted in the medial region of young white-tailed deer femora.

Location

Neville 322

Start Date

4-14-2018 12:00 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 12:00 PM

Indication for Bone Remodeling in the Lateral Aspect of Young White-tailed Deer Distal Femora

Neville 322

In this project, we examined the innate stiffness of bone material in the distal lateral femora of young white-tailed deer. We researched this property of bone in order to develop a better understanding of how bone function differs in different regions of the femur. We experimented on this property of bone material by taking small cubic samples of bone and loading them in compression to test their stiffness in all three orientations – axial, transversal, and radial. After testing the stiffness of over thirty cubes, we analyzed our results and compared them to those of previously conducted similar research in the medial region of deer femora to see whether or not bone function differs amongst these two regions. We found that the function does appear to differ, as the results of our study were different than those of the previous research conducted in the medial region of young white-tailed deer femora.