Title

Numerical Estimation in Glass Patterns

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

The Random Regular Numerosity Illusion (RRNI) is a phenomenon in which an organized array of dots is perceived to be more numerous than a random array of dots. Previous studies have focused on the correlation between the organization of the pattern and the subject’s ability to enumerate the dots. The current research tested the possibility that other spatial features – such as density or area – could be the source of this illusion by using Glass patterns. Glass patterns are two random arrays of dots which have been copied and layered on top of one another. They allow a manipulation of organization or coherence while controlling for density and area. Subjects were shown two Glass patterns with varying coherence and asked to choose which was more numerous. While there was a clear effect of relative quantity, there was no effect of organization, contrary to previous RRNI studies. Future studies would directly manipulate area and density to further test the idea that organization is not the limiting factor in the estimation of quantity.

Location

Neville 305

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:15 AM

Numerical Estimation in Glass Patterns

Neville 305

The Random Regular Numerosity Illusion (RRNI) is a phenomenon in which an organized array of dots is perceived to be more numerous than a random array of dots. Previous studies have focused on the correlation between the organization of the pattern and the subject’s ability to enumerate the dots. The current research tested the possibility that other spatial features – such as density or area – could be the source of this illusion by using Glass patterns. Glass patterns are two random arrays of dots which have been copied and layered on top of one another. They allow a manipulation of organization or coherence while controlling for density and area. Subjects were shown two Glass patterns with varying coherence and asked to choose which was more numerous. While there was a clear effect of relative quantity, there was no effect of organization, contrary to previous RRNI studies. Future studies would directly manipulate area and density to further test the idea that organization is not the limiting factor in the estimation of quantity.