Title

How Mother's Belief in Misinformation Impact's their Children's Memory

School Name

Governor's School for Science and Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology and Sociology

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

It is known that interviewer bias is able to influence how children recall events (Ceci and Bruck, 1993; Bruck, Ceci, and Hembrooke, 2002). Principe et al. (2013) found that when mothers have been misinformed about their children’s experiences it can lead to children’s false report of events. In this study, we manipulated mother’s belief in the misinformation and their degree of control to examine how these factors can influence children’s memory recall. In this study, we used those two categories of mothers and then used a belief manipulation in order to make the two categories into four: outcome-oriented/strong suggestion, process-oriented/strong suggestion, outcome-oriented/weak suggestion, and process-oriented/weak suggestion. The results concluded that the two groups of mothers who were given the strong suggestion manipulation had a higher belief. Those mothers also were the most biased in their conversations with their children. The children of the outcome oriented/ strong suggestion mothers made the most false reports had the most details in their false reports.

Location

Neville 305

Start Date

4-14-2018 9:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

COinS
 
Apr 14th, 9:30 AM

How Mother's Belief in Misinformation Impact's their Children's Memory

Neville 305

It is known that interviewer bias is able to influence how children recall events (Ceci and Bruck, 1993; Bruck, Ceci, and Hembrooke, 2002). Principe et al. (2013) found that when mothers have been misinformed about their children’s experiences it can lead to children’s false report of events. In this study, we manipulated mother’s belief in the misinformation and their degree of control to examine how these factors can influence children’s memory recall. In this study, we used those two categories of mothers and then used a belief manipulation in order to make the two categories into four: outcome-oriented/strong suggestion, process-oriented/strong suggestion, outcome-oriented/weak suggestion, and process-oriented/weak suggestion. The results concluded that the two groups of mothers who were given the strong suggestion manipulation had a higher belief. Those mothers also were the most biased in their conversations with their children. The children of the outcome oriented/ strong suggestion mothers made the most false reports had the most details in their false reports.