Title

Geometric Analysis of Asymmetrical Fault Synthesis for Three-Phase Transformer Connections Using Computer Simulation

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Engineering

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Within a simulated grid environment various voltage and frequency conditions were applied to a device under test (DUT) to examine its performance. By using the Line to Line and Line to Neutral Voltages and transformer relationship equations, a derivation for the grid side voltage required to induce both a single and double phase sag on the DUT was produced. A total of 18 derivations were produced and subsequently used in a MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation to observe trends that appear in each transformer connection and type of sag. Trends that appeared in the data collected include but are not limited to the Vrms and phase angle changes from LL to LN voltages. These trends support the concept of three phase balanced sag and other preliminary models. Additionally, these trends allow for the classification of the transformer connections under both single and double phase fault conditions. This work allows for a better understanding of three-phase transformer connections and the characteristics of faults across them.

Location

Founders Hall 250 B

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:15 AM

Geometric Analysis of Asymmetrical Fault Synthesis for Three-Phase Transformer Connections Using Computer Simulation

Founders Hall 250 B

Within a simulated grid environment various voltage and frequency conditions were applied to a device under test (DUT) to examine its performance. By using the Line to Line and Line to Neutral Voltages and transformer relationship equations, a derivation for the grid side voltage required to induce both a single and double phase sag on the DUT was produced. A total of 18 derivations were produced and subsequently used in a MATLAB/SIMULINK simulation to observe trends that appear in each transformer connection and type of sag. Trends that appeared in the data collected include but are not limited to the Vrms and phase angle changes from LL to LN voltages. These trends support the concept of three phase balanced sag and other preliminary models. Additionally, these trends allow for the classification of the transformer connections under both single and double phase fault conditions. This work allows for a better understanding of three-phase transformer connections and the characteristics of faults across them.