Title

Impact of Alternative Methods of Menstrual Health Management on Young Women

Author(s)

Eden TurekFollow

School Name

Center for Advanced Technical Studies

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Consumer Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Abstract

The goal of this research is to analyze the impact of alternative forms of menstrual health management in young women, particularly girls age 14 to 18. Normalizing non-prevalent menstrual health management options in the younger population directly contributes to improved quality of life and menstrual product satisfaction. Additionally, the implications of the study could be applied to the broader spectrum of international women’s health. If the participants are given the menstrual cup to use for 4 months, then they will prefer it to their traditional method of menstrual health management. By supplying the participants with menstrual cups and surveying them along with the control, who report on their use of more traditional products such as tampons and sanitary pads, analysis of general satisfactory trends over time is able to be conducted. It is expected that at the end of the 4 month research period, those in the experimental group will prefer the menstrual cup over the traditional methods, and in turn will have an improved quality of life along with a better understanding of their physiology due to the more intimate, non-disposable nature of the menstrual cup. This is Phase I of a II Phase project, in the future this project could be implemented on a more global scale, and further analyze the correlation of socio-economic class, race, age, and other factors in menstrual product satisfaction.

Location

Founders Hall 255 A

Start Date

3-30-2019 8:30 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 8:30 AM

Impact of Alternative Methods of Menstrual Health Management on Young Women

Founders Hall 255 A

The goal of this research is to analyze the impact of alternative forms of menstrual health management in young women, particularly girls age 14 to 18. Normalizing non-prevalent menstrual health management options in the younger population directly contributes to improved quality of life and menstrual product satisfaction. Additionally, the implications of the study could be applied to the broader spectrum of international women’s health. If the participants are given the menstrual cup to use for 4 months, then they will prefer it to their traditional method of menstrual health management. By supplying the participants with menstrual cups and surveying them along with the control, who report on their use of more traditional products such as tampons and sanitary pads, analysis of general satisfactory trends over time is able to be conducted. It is expected that at the end of the 4 month research period, those in the experimental group will prefer the menstrual cup over the traditional methods, and in turn will have an improved quality of life along with a better understanding of their physiology due to the more intimate, non-disposable nature of the menstrual cup. This is Phase I of a II Phase project, in the future this project could be implemented on a more global scale, and further analyze the correlation of socio-economic class, race, age, and other factors in menstrual product satisfaction.