Title

Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

Author(s)

John EstockFollow

School Name

South Carolina Governor's School for Science & Mathematics

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Chemistry

Presentation Type

Mentored

Abstract

Crystalline materials are largely used in a variety of applications such as catalysis, nuclear detection, lasers and even biomedical applications when prepared in the nanoscale. Optogenetics, involves using light to control neuronal firing. Scintillating nanoparticles that can be modified with targeting ligands to attach to a target opsin which can be activated by a low dose of X-ray radiation, eliminates the need for fiber optic waveguides or light emitting diodes implanted deep within the brain structure which reduces the probability of failure as the surgery used to implant the cables into the brain causing damage to brain tissue. In this study, Cerium doped Lutetium silicate nanoparticles are being developed using a facile core-shell coating procedure for this application. The nanoparticles were successfully synthesized in batches of greater sizes than previous experiments, previously only small scale batches were synthesized to understand the correct ratios of metals to obtain the correct properties. Future work on this project includes doping the nanoparticles with metals other than Cerium.

Location

Founders Hall 108 A

Start Date

3-30-2019 8:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral Only

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 8:45 AM

Synthesis of Nanoparticles for Biomedical Applications

Founders Hall 108 A

Crystalline materials are largely used in a variety of applications such as catalysis, nuclear detection, lasers and even biomedical applications when prepared in the nanoscale. Optogenetics, involves using light to control neuronal firing. Scintillating nanoparticles that can be modified with targeting ligands to attach to a target opsin which can be activated by a low dose of X-ray radiation, eliminates the need for fiber optic waveguides or light emitting diodes implanted deep within the brain structure which reduces the probability of failure as the surgery used to implant the cables into the brain causing damage to brain tissue. In this study, Cerium doped Lutetium silicate nanoparticles are being developed using a facile core-shell coating procedure for this application. The nanoparticles were successfully synthesized in batches of greater sizes than previous experiments, previously only small scale batches were synthesized to understand the correct ratios of metals to obtain the correct properties. Future work on this project includes doping the nanoparticles with metals other than Cerium.