Title

The Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide (6%), Humic Acid (6%), and Decaying Hordeum Vulgare on Pyrocystis Fusiformis Growth and Bioluminescence

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

11th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

3rd Place

Abstract

Algae are producers for many ecosystems, providing nutrients and energy necessary for an environment. Harmful algal blooms (HABs) wreak havoc on environments and recently, the frequency of HABs has increased. Blooms of Pyrocystis fusiformis, a type of bioluminescent algae, can quickly become toxic, affecting tourism and aquatic environments. The purpose of this experiment was to narrow down properties that allow Hordeum vulgare to inhibit algae growth, without affecting P. fusiformis bioluminescence. It was hypothesized that the combination of chemicals from barley would prove most effective at inhibiting algal growth. It was also hypothesized that the use of hydrogen peroxide would cause Pyrocystis fusiformis to bioluminesce most frequently. The algae was exposed to 3 mL of hydrogen peroxide, humic acid, and barley extract for twenty-one days. Then, frequency of bioluminescence (FoB) was observed and growth was recorded by dry massing the algae. The hypothesis claiming that hydrogen peroxide would result in the largest number of bioluminescent occurrences, was supported, F(3, 116)=216.8311, p<0.00001. The second hypothesis predicting that barley extract would suspend algal growth the most was not supported. Nevertheless, the null hypothesis could be rejected, F(3, 116)=107.4650, p<0.00001, as no statistical difference was found between the trials. While all the independent variables suspended algal growth, hydrogen peroxide did not significantly alter the frequency of bioluminescence in Pyrocystis fusiformis. The components and mechanics of hydrogen peroxide should be studied further in order to develop a beneficial method to suspend algal growth.

Location

Founders Hall 213 C

Start Date

3-30-2019 8:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 8:45 AM

The Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide (6%), Humic Acid (6%), and Decaying Hordeum Vulgare on Pyrocystis Fusiformis Growth and Bioluminescence

Founders Hall 213 C

Algae are producers for many ecosystems, providing nutrients and energy necessary for an environment. Harmful algal blooms (HABs) wreak havoc on environments and recently, the frequency of HABs has increased. Blooms of Pyrocystis fusiformis, a type of bioluminescent algae, can quickly become toxic, affecting tourism and aquatic environments. The purpose of this experiment was to narrow down properties that allow Hordeum vulgare to inhibit algae growth, without affecting P. fusiformis bioluminescence. It was hypothesized that the combination of chemicals from barley would prove most effective at inhibiting algal growth. It was also hypothesized that the use of hydrogen peroxide would cause Pyrocystis fusiformis to bioluminesce most frequently. The algae was exposed to 3 mL of hydrogen peroxide, humic acid, and barley extract for twenty-one days. Then, frequency of bioluminescence (FoB) was observed and growth was recorded by dry massing the algae. The hypothesis claiming that hydrogen peroxide would result in the largest number of bioluminescent occurrences, was supported, F(3, 116)=216.8311, p<0.00001. The second hypothesis predicting that barley extract would suspend algal growth the most was not supported. Nevertheless, the null hypothesis could be rejected, F(3, 116)=107.4650, p<0.00001, as no statistical difference was found between the trials. While all the independent variables suspended algal growth, hydrogen peroxide did not significantly alter the frequency of bioluminescence in Pyrocystis fusiformis. The components and mechanics of hydrogen peroxide should be studied further in order to develop a beneficial method to suspend algal growth.