Title

The Effect of Learning to Play a Musical Instrument on Creative Ability In Middle School Students

School Name

Chapin High School

Grade Level

12th Grade

Presentation Topic

Psychology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

Through many previous studies, it has been found that practicing music, particularly playing an instrument, has significant positive effects on cognitive abilities, including working memory and processing speed. However, the effects of music training on creativity are uncertain from the current literature, likely because of the ambiguity of the term creativity. This research looks to determine whether or not the process of learning to play an instrument has any significant effect on creative ability in middle school students through a pre-test / post-test method, using a combination of the Wallach-Kogan (W-K) Creativity Test and the Guilford Alternative Uses Task. The tests will be administered surrounding a 6 week treatment period (band class). The population includes 270 students in grades 5-6 with a mean age of 11.2 years. 140 students are enrolled in band class, making up the treatment group, as they are learning to play instruments. 130 students are enrolled in general music, making up the control group, as they are not learning to play instruments. The results of a paired t-test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test do not show any statistically significant results at the 25% significance level. The conclusion of the present research, therefore, is that a 6 week period of training on a new musical instrument does not have a significant effect on the creative ability of middle school students as measured by the W-K Creativity Test and Guilford Alternative Uses Task.

Location

Founders Hall 251 B

Start Date

3-30-2019 1:30 PM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 1:30 PM

The Effect of Learning to Play a Musical Instrument on Creative Ability In Middle School Students

Founders Hall 251 B

Through many previous studies, it has been found that practicing music, particularly playing an instrument, has significant positive effects on cognitive abilities, including working memory and processing speed. However, the effects of music training on creativity are uncertain from the current literature, likely because of the ambiguity of the term creativity. This research looks to determine whether or not the process of learning to play an instrument has any significant effect on creative ability in middle school students through a pre-test / post-test method, using a combination of the Wallach-Kogan (W-K) Creativity Test and the Guilford Alternative Uses Task. The tests will be administered surrounding a 6 week treatment period (band class). The population includes 270 students in grades 5-6 with a mean age of 11.2 years. 140 students are enrolled in band class, making up the treatment group, as they are learning to play instruments. 130 students are enrolled in general music, making up the control group, as they are not learning to play instruments. The results of a paired t-test and a Wilcoxon signed-rank test do not show any statistically significant results at the 25% significance level. The conclusion of the present research, therefore, is that a 6 week period of training on a new musical instrument does not have a significant effect on the creative ability of middle school students as measured by the W-K Creativity Test and Guilford Alternative Uses Task.