Title

The Effect of Photoshop on the Ability to Differentiate between Original, Semi-Edited, and Mildly Edited Photos in High School Students

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Sociology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

With the introduction of digital technology, the forgery of digital images has become a recurring issue for the public. The purpose of this experiment was to conclude the percentage of people who are able to differentiate between original and edited images. It was hypothesized that as the validity of images decrease, the average amount of participants who are able to correctly differentiate between the original and edited images would decrease. Sixty different images were captured, then edited with the software, Adobe Photoshop CC. Three Google Forms were created for testing, with twenty images on each form. All three types of images were evenly distributed to each form. Participants were collected and randomly assigned an order for testing. The forms were then distributed to each group and data was collected. There was a significant difference in the mean of the original group and the semi-edited and mildly-edited groups. A One-Way ANOVA was run with an alpha value of 0.05 for the three levels. The resulting p value was found to be < 0.01. The results concluded that the data collected was significant. A Tukey test was then performed for each level of editing (original, semi-edited, and mildly-edited). The results concluded that there was a significant difference between the original and the other two groups, but there was no significant difference between the semi-edited and mildly-edited image groups. This experiment shows that the majority of the population is unable to tell the difference between original and edited images.

Location

Founders Hall 251 C

Start Date

3-30-2019 11:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 11:45 AM

The Effect of Photoshop on the Ability to Differentiate between Original, Semi-Edited, and Mildly Edited Photos in High School Students

Founders Hall 251 C

With the introduction of digital technology, the forgery of digital images has become a recurring issue for the public. The purpose of this experiment was to conclude the percentage of people who are able to differentiate between original and edited images. It was hypothesized that as the validity of images decrease, the average amount of participants who are able to correctly differentiate between the original and edited images would decrease. Sixty different images were captured, then edited with the software, Adobe Photoshop CC. Three Google Forms were created for testing, with twenty images on each form. All three types of images were evenly distributed to each form. Participants were collected and randomly assigned an order for testing. The forms were then distributed to each group and data was collected. There was a significant difference in the mean of the original group and the semi-edited and mildly-edited groups. A One-Way ANOVA was run with an alpha value of 0.05 for the three levels. The resulting p value was found to be < 0.01. The results concluded that the data collected was significant. A Tukey test was then performed for each level of editing (original, semi-edited, and mildly-edited). The results concluded that there was a significant difference between the original and the other two groups, but there was no significant difference between the semi-edited and mildly-edited image groups. This experiment shows that the majority of the population is unable to tell the difference between original and edited images.