Title

The Effect of Soaps with and without Triclosan on the Health of Penicillium Italicum

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

9th Grade

Presentation Topic

Microbiology

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

3rd Place

Abstract

Our intent is to research the effect of soaps with and without triclosan on the health of Penicillium Italicum. Penicillium Italicum is a fungus harmful mainly to citrus plants. Throughout our experiment, we used the following materials: 60 petri dishes, three 500mL bottles of agar, an incubator, a fridge, Colony Counter (a smartphone app), Ajax Antibacterial soap, Dawn Soap, an incubator, sterile swabs, and three tubes of living Penicillium Italicum. Google Sheets was used for data analysis. First, we filled all petri dishes with enough agar to cover the bottom, which translates to close to a millimeter. The two groups with soap were mixed with 1 part soap to 25 parts agar. From there, we divided the 60 dishes into the three separate groups of 20. The control group was introduced to the fungus with nothing added beyond the agar. The second and third groups both had soaps mixed into their agar and cultivated. Next, data was collected over the course of three days after it had been determined that the fungus had grown to a point where detection was possible. “Detection” relates to the Colony Counter app suggested by the head of science at our school that uses photos of petri dishes to identify colonies of fungi and bacteria.

Location

Founders Hall 216 B

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:15 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

Yes

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:15 AM

The Effect of Soaps with and without Triclosan on the Health of Penicillium Italicum

Founders Hall 216 B

Our intent is to research the effect of soaps with and without triclosan on the health of Penicillium Italicum. Penicillium Italicum is a fungus harmful mainly to citrus plants. Throughout our experiment, we used the following materials: 60 petri dishes, three 500mL bottles of agar, an incubator, a fridge, Colony Counter (a smartphone app), Ajax Antibacterial soap, Dawn Soap, an incubator, sterile swabs, and three tubes of living Penicillium Italicum. Google Sheets was used for data analysis. First, we filled all petri dishes with enough agar to cover the bottom, which translates to close to a millimeter. The two groups with soap were mixed with 1 part soap to 25 parts agar. From there, we divided the 60 dishes into the three separate groups of 20. The control group was introduced to the fungus with nothing added beyond the agar. The second and third groups both had soaps mixed into their agar and cultivated. Next, data was collected over the course of three days after it had been determined that the fungus had grown to a point where detection was possible. “Detection” relates to the Colony Counter app suggested by the head of science at our school that uses photos of petri dishes to identify colonies of fungi and bacteria.