Title

The Effect of Temperature on the Reaction Time of Vinegar and Baking Soda

School Name

Heathwood Hall Episcopal School

Grade Level

9th Grade

Presentation Topic

Chemistry

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to investigate if the temperature of vinegar had any effect on the time it took for its reaction to stop, when mixed with baking soda. It was hypothesized that the temperature of the vinegar will cause a change in reaction time, specifically colder temperatures causing a slower reaction time, while hotter resulted in a faster time. Four different temperatures of vinegar were tested, based off of the room temperature vinegar: -2℃ (50° below room temperature) 12℃ (25° below room temperature) 40℃ (25° above room temperature), and 52℃ (50° room temperature). The heated or cooled vinegar was poured into the baking soda, and when put together, was timed until the reaction completely stopped without being touched or tampered with. The results supported past experiments; the vinegar with higher temperatures had a significantly faster reaction time, while the vinegar that was cooled, or had a lower temperature, took much longer to fully react with the baking soda.

Location

Founders Hall 111 A

Start Date

3-30-2019 9:00 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 9:00 AM

The Effect of Temperature on the Reaction Time of Vinegar and Baking Soda

Founders Hall 111 A

The purpose of this study was to investigate if the temperature of vinegar had any effect on the time it took for its reaction to stop, when mixed with baking soda. It was hypothesized that the temperature of the vinegar will cause a change in reaction time, specifically colder temperatures causing a slower reaction time, while hotter resulted in a faster time. Four different temperatures of vinegar were tested, based off of the room temperature vinegar: -2℃ (50° below room temperature) 12℃ (25° below room temperature) 40℃ (25° above room temperature), and 52℃ (50° room temperature). The heated or cooled vinegar was poured into the baking soda, and when put together, was timed until the reaction completely stopped without being touched or tampered with. The results supported past experiments; the vinegar with higher temperatures had a significantly faster reaction time, while the vinegar that was cooled, or had a lower temperature, took much longer to fully react with the baking soda.