Title

The Effects of Natural Bioaccumulator and Hyperaccumulator Biochars for Soil Phytoremediation and Compound Sustainability of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium, and pH by Lepidium Sativum

Author(s)

Ronit PathakFollow

School Name

Spring Valley High School

Grade Level

10th Grade

Presentation Topic

Environmental Science

Presentation Type

Non-Mentored

Oral Presentation Award

2nd Place

Written Paper Award

3rd Place

Abstract

In opposition to artificial phytoremediation techniques, plant-based composts have arisen in efforts to combat heavy metal detoxification in garden soil. This experiment aimed to remodel hyperaccumulating and bioaccumulating plant species in combination with pine chips in efforts to successfully retain traces of N, P, K, and pH in soil. It was hypothesized that if compounded Lactuca sativa is added to pine chips, soil phytoremediation rates and compound levels of N, P, K, and pH within the soil of Lepidium sativum would be sustained at their healthiest levels. Thirty pre-grown hyperaccumulator and bioaccumulator plants, Brassica oleracea and Lactuca sativa, were massed with pine chips, baked in an oven at 115 ℃ for 1.5 hours, and then grilled for 20 minutes. After application to soil pots, LusterLeaf kits were obtained and capsule tests were run to determine changes in K, N, P, and pH. The hypothesis was partially supported as the bioaccumulator biochar had the highest averages in oz./100 square feet for K and pH, the hyperaccumulator biochar group for P, and the control group for N. Each of the experimental groups were modeled by time plots, where P hyperaccumulator biochar (p=0.0097<ɑ=0.05), N control (p=0.001<ɑ=0.05), K bioaccumulator biochar (p=0.007<ɑ=0.05), and pH bioaccumulator biochar averages = 7.05. It can be concluded that although common soil is best for nitrogen sustainability, hyperaccumulator and bioaccumulator biochars are best suited for optimal potassium, phosphorus, and pH retention in soil.

Location

Founders Hall 213 A

Start Date

3-30-2019 8:45 AM

Presentation Format

Oral and Written

Group Project

No

COinS
 
Mar 30th, 8:45 AM

The Effects of Natural Bioaccumulator and Hyperaccumulator Biochars for Soil Phytoremediation and Compound Sustainability of Nitrogen, Phosphorus, Potassium, and pH by Lepidium Sativum

Founders Hall 213 A

In opposition to artificial phytoremediation techniques, plant-based composts have arisen in efforts to combat heavy metal detoxification in garden soil. This experiment aimed to remodel hyperaccumulating and bioaccumulating plant species in combination with pine chips in efforts to successfully retain traces of N, P, K, and pH in soil. It was hypothesized that if compounded Lactuca sativa is added to pine chips, soil phytoremediation rates and compound levels of N, P, K, and pH within the soil of Lepidium sativum would be sustained at their healthiest levels. Thirty pre-grown hyperaccumulator and bioaccumulator plants, Brassica oleracea and Lactuca sativa, were massed with pine chips, baked in an oven at 115 ℃ for 1.5 hours, and then grilled for 20 minutes. After application to soil pots, LusterLeaf kits were obtained and capsule tests were run to determine changes in K, N, P, and pH. The hypothesis was partially supported as the bioaccumulator biochar had the highest averages in oz./100 square feet for K and pH, the hyperaccumulator biochar group for P, and the control group for N. Each of the experimental groups were modeled by time plots, where P hyperaccumulator biochar (p=0.0097<ɑ=0.05), N control (p=0.001<ɑ=0.05), K bioaccumulator biochar (p=0.007<ɑ=0.05), and pH bioaccumulator biochar averages = 7.05. It can be concluded that although common soil is best for nitrogen sustainability, hyperaccumulator and bioaccumulator biochars are best suited for optimal potassium, phosphorus, and pH retention in soil.